Category Archives: Travel

Views from breakfast

A bit of Vietnam, A bit more of Thailand

Aug 14, 2016

The ruins of Cambodia fade behind me. I have a flight departing Siem Reap at 7:15 PM that will arrive in Da Nang, Vietnam at 8:40 PM. This is about as close as you can get to Hoi An. From the airport you need a taxi ride that will take about 45 minutes.

This taxi ride feels like a trip. There haven’t been too many bright lights but Da Nang brings them. The place reminds me more of the lights in Vegas than anything else. Everything has flashing lights that change colors or display animations. Bridges. Ferris wheels. Buildings. Dragons. Everything for about a ten-minute ride is lit up in bright lights. It’s a weird feeling for me because I haven’t heard of Da Nang previously. I had no idea something like this was out here. The streets of the city are covered with people out grabbing bowls of pho or drinks. It feels very lively, which is odd given it’s only a Sunday night. I won’t be stopping in Da Nang on this trip but it’s a destination I would certainly check out if I’m ever back.

The taxi ride continues until the lights fade to darkness. The hallucination lasts about 10 minutes, which really makes you wonder if it’s real or not. I’ll have to check on the return taxi the following day.

The next half hour of driving is about as crazy as the first fifteen minutes. If you are distracted from the traffic patterns in the first part of the trip, they are obvious during this part. Vietnam has a strange way of driving. Passing on the left. Passing on the right. Going well over the center lane as though you are playing a game of chicken. And of course car horns. Everyone driving is in on the game though. There’s no way you’d be able to make some of the passes if the car in the opposite lane wasn’t friendly enough to move over for you. It seems like it’s been able to work for the country so far, but there’s no way this is a sustainable traffic pattern for the speed of the future.

It’s around ten at night by the time I check in. The guy at check in says he needs to hold my passport. I tell him that’s not possible. Apparently this is common in hotels for Vietnam but I could care less. No one is holding my passport for longer than a couple seconds for obvious reasons. He instead makes a copy and gives me back the original. I wouldn’t have been willing to stay at the hotel if they had to keep my passport. If I have to eat the cost of the night then so be it, but it’s just a risk I’m not willing to take.

I debate going out for a bit to see the city, but I decide on rest and to get a fresh start in the morning.

Aug 15, 2016

My flight is departing at 10:50 PM from Da Nang to arrive 12:05 AM in Hanoi. I have plenty of time to check out what I want to in Hoi An. The old town of the city is very beautiful. It’s full of tourists but there’s stuff to see and do. There are a million restaurants and coffee houses and places selling various items.

The Japanese Bridge is a popular sight in the town. Both sides of the bridge have places to explore. A bride and groom are taking wedding pictures here at the time that I’m there.

Only thing better than Japanese bridge is the house
Only thing better than Japanese bridge is the house

After walking through the entire city I stop for some food. I’ve been looking for the best bowl of pho I can find and I finally do so. It may not look like much in the picture but this bowl of pho bo is just perfect. It’s a little bowl of heaven. I’m not exactly sure of what flavor of the liquid is but it’s like this light sweet juice that’s full of umami. I could be completely wrong, but the cool thing these past few years has just been to taste something and say “wow, that’s great umami flavor,” so I’m just going to run with it.

Pho bo splash
Pho bo splash

I also add wonton crisps, a bowl of local Hoi An noodle, and a Vietnamese hot coffee to the meal. The crisp has the consistency of a light tortilla or potato chip almost. It’s extremely delicate but so beautifully fried. It breaks apart immediately but only at the parts you want. The local noodle is fantastic as well. It’s a great meal.

I decide I want some more coffee and to also cool off from the long bit of walking I’ve been doing. I swing into a coffee shop to work on the write up for the last blog post. The coffee house is a beautiful place that roasts their own bean. I ask for an Americano and it comes out iced. They seem to want to ice your coffee here every time, even when you sometimes specifically ask for hot. I guess it’s a bit hot out, but I prefer my coffee hot, even on really hot days.

After coffee I head out to stroll about the city some more. The bright hot sun of the earlier day has been replaced by a slightly cooler day. The city has turned dark. It’s beautiful to step out into the city like this. The coffee house has been a portal to almost an entirely different town. It’s as though I stepped out of a nice little city and stepped into this beautiful and charming town. The town starts to take a hold of my soul and does so for the rest of the night.

Hoi An lights up the city at night. It’s not as over the top as Da Nang but there are beautiful lights all over. You can add to the lights by purchasing a candle from one of the candle salespeople around the river. You can make a wish and then drop the candle boat in the river to make your wish come true. It’s beautiful to see these things along the canal in this setting, but I’m assuming it leads to lots of garbage in the water, which I’m not the biggest fan of. No wishes for me.

Hoi An was lit
Hoi An was lit

The sun sets over the town. At this point the empty town I walked many miles through is alive with people who were either out on excursions or trying to avoid the heat of the sun. The town continues to get packed with people as the night goes along. And yet its charm ever increases.

Lit by the sun
Lit by the sun

I’m a bit bummed I don’t have the best pictures of Hoi An, but I have to put the best I took here. Darkness leads to more lights and more action.

The candles and the lights
The candles and the lights

It’s almost like Hoi An wants to grow up and become like Da Nang. I hope it doesn’t. I doubt it ever could, but things like that beautifully lit up pink lotus blossom stand out in the same ways that some of the lights of Da Nang stand out.

All of the lights, all of the lights
All of the lights, all of the lights

Eventually my time in the city is up. I head back to the hotel. I’m pretty sweated up given the heat and humidity of the day and I have a flight to catch. It’s a bit lame going into flights all sweated up, and I guess the guy in the hotel lobby sympathizes with me. He offers to let me take a shower before I head out and I very happily agree.

He calls for a taxi and I get in. The shower certainly helped to make the flight more enjoyable, but I’m pretty much immediately back sweating once I get outside. The forty-five minute drive to the airport is done by some guy who is driving like he has places to get to.

Eventually we get to the area of the lights outside of Da Nang airport. It was all real. The lit up bridges. The ferris wheel. The art installations. All of it on fire, lighting the darkness up in the way that Vegas does.

The flight comes and goes, and before long it’s midnight and I’m in Hanoi, Vietnam. I want to book a trip to Halong Bay. I look around the airport but no one seems overly interested in selling me a trip. I’ll wait until I get to the hotel because I’m sure they’ll be able to help me out. I don’t want to book at the hotel and then have the bus not pick me up for some reason because of miscommunication.

While we’re waiting for bags an Egyptian guy comes up to me and asks if I want to split a taxi. We’re both going to the city center so I agree to save money on the taxi fare. On the forty-five minute ride we talk about what we do and about life and whatnot. He said he was going to school for engineering because his dad wanted him to. He eventually started a business and dropped out of school. He was out of school for a year and his business was successful before he broke the news to his father. We get to his hotel and the taxi driver drops him off. Another three minutes and I’m at my hotel.

I check into the hotel and ask them to book a tour of Halong Bay for the morning. It’s after one in the morning now. The guy doesn’t think there is any available. I tell him I’ll take anything. I just want to head out in the morning and see the sights. He calls around and gets me a tour on V’Spirit Cruises for an overnight trip like I want. It leaves the hotel around 8 AM.

Getting that tour booked was an example of how I know how to travel this area and without stress. It was difficult to book tours when I tried online. I knew that I would be able to get a tour once I got to Hanoi. Hanoi is a place where you will find a tour to Halong Bay. Either the airport, the town, or your hotel. I knew that I would be able to get a tour booked. I just knew it. I didn’t know how. I knew it might be difficult. But I knew I would be able to get it done. And I did. It was a good feeling.

I slid off to bed for a couple hours of sleep.

Aug 16, 2016

Before long I’m up. I eat a quick breakfast at the hotel and the tour comes to pick me up. We drive around Hanoi to various other hotels picking up other passengers for the trip. The city looked very gritty last night from the seat of the taxi. Graffiti and empty streets outside of a few shady characters. The daylight brings hustle and bustle that covers the darker image that the night portrays. Eventually when the bus is almost full of people we swing out for Halong Bay.

The ride to Halong Bay takes 4 hours with a rest stop in the middle. The tour guide gives us information on Vietnam, Hanoi, and Halong Bay. I spend the ride messing around with some pictures.

Eventually we get to the pier and onto the boat. The weather for the day goes much like the weather has for my entire trip. It’s a mix of clouds and sun. No rain for today, but there is the possibility. Weather changes quick during the rainy or storm season, and this is especially so out on the water.

We check into our rooms and head up to the main dining area for some lunch. The table is comprised of a guy from Boston that I end up making friends with. He was born in Korea but is serving in the United States Army. He’s on vacation and plans to head back to live in Austin after it’s over. The rest of the table is comprised of two Korean guys whom I don’t talk much with. One of them has a warehouse in Austin apparently.

Lunch goes well and I venture off to the deck to take some pictures. Halong Bay is unlike anything I have ever seen or even know exists. It’s comprised of so many little islands that jut directly up out of the sea. The cliffs of these islands are often covered in shrubbery although sometimes they are bare. The color of the water is this odd green color that is not typical of many areas that I have seen. And this scene repeats for what seems like ever in all directions. In front of you. Behind you. To the left and right. It’s just this landscape of these individual islands the completely surrounds you. I imagine it would be fairly easy to get lost here without any sense of direction outside of the landscape around you.

Halong Bay
Halong Bay

I shoot pictures off and on with the Bostonian. At one point we’re sitting down and just taking the scenery in. We end up talking with a French couple. They seem like they have been dating for some time, but really it’s only been a couple months.

This scene goes forever in 360
This scene goes forever in 360

I could have taken a million pictures here. The landscape is so gorgeous. But I restrained myself and only shot a couple.

Gorgeous rock
Gorgeous rock

The cruise has some activities for the passengers. The first is a walk through a cave called Hang Sung Sot. The cave is pretty beautiful. It’s hot out so I was hoping it would be cold like the underground cave I visited with my sisters out in Kentucky, but it’s an above ground cave. It’s a bit hot and humid in there but it’s not too bad. You just get used to dealing with the heat and humidity out here and get on enjoying the sights.

Hanging in caves
Hanging in caves

This cave is extremely liberal with their lighting choice. At most areas they don’t intend to keep the integrity of the cave with natural lighting. Instead they have various shades of color such as blue, purple, green, red, and yellow. The end result makes the larger cave appear almost alien. Halong Bay itself could definitely be from another planet, but this cave with it’s lighting is really out there.

Alien cave
Alien cave

At the end of the hike you are left with a beautiful view of the bay. This is one of the iconic views of Halong Bay that shows up when you google the site. I was pretty happy to be able to view it like this. Here’s an image of me ruining the beautiful bay for you courtesy of my favorite Korean-Bostonian.

Yay a pic of me
Yay a pic of me

And here’s a better picture of the bay. It’s a great view from up here.

Beautiful even with the clouds
Beautiful even with the clouds

We get back on the boat and change into bathing suits to get our kayaking on. I pair up with my buddy and in the spirit of the olympics decide to have a race with two Canadians. They’re from Toronto and are doing a similar trip around Southeast Asia. They’re bouncing around from place to place, actually awaiting a third friend to come to the area to meet up with.

I think we end up taking the gold for kayaking, but the desire to win any medals is taken over by the gorgeousness of the bay. We kayak through caves and get up close with the beautiful rock we’ve been passing from the height and distance of our boat. The rocks seem massive from these little kayaks, which bob up and down in the somewhat wavy water.

We reach what looks like a good turning around point but the Torontonians want to push forward to another cave. We decide to follow along for the ride. Eventually after a whole bunch of kayaking, we swing back to the dock. It’s been over an hour but we’ve lost track of time out there on the bay.

As the dock comes into view we see the little boat with all of the other passengers departing for the cruise ship. We wave to them and they jokingly tell us their leaving us behind. We figure we’ll catch the next ride when they get dropped off.

When we eventually arrive at the dock we see that the little boat was still filled with our fellow cruisers. Some of them have probably been waiting for a while for us to finish up having fun. And the Canadians are way behind. It takes them a couple minutes to catch up and we kind of wait around the dock out of sight of our little ship so that we can all get onboard together. When we finally do get on board it’s to a roar of applause, cheering for us being late. How American of us, and Canadian too I suppose.

After kayaks we head back to our rooms and get ready for dinner. It feels like a cruise. It feels like dinner is supposed to be fancy. I kind of want to throw a button down on, but instead opt for more of the same outfit I’ve been wearing on this trip. A black v-neck and shorts. It’s pretty much all I ever wear these days.

Our dinner table is myself, Boston, and the French couple. The French are, I am not making this up, deep in discussion over what wines to order for dinner. I tend to stick with beer, but beers on this trip are your typical beer. Tiger and Ha Noi Beer and the like. I join the French with a glass of local Vietnamese red wine. I want to order the red but am brought white. I wanted white with dinner as I anticipating more seafood and whatnot, but no worries. I drink the white and eventually order red with dinner.

Dinner, like lunch, is this massive 5+ course family style meal. The dishes come out to your table, you take a bit and eat, and then soon after another dish arrives. Some of the dishes are prepared in extravagant styles by lighting on fire and whatnot, which gives you a break in the pace. The pace is a bit fast though, so you have to make sure you eat quickly.

After dinner the bartender comes out to make some special drink that is made by waterfalling a bunch of alcohols down a bunch of glasses and like lighting them on fire and stuff. It’s for a very special birthday, which actually ends up being the French girl at our table. I had no idea who the drink was for so I was a bit surprised when it made it’s way over to our table.

Later after the meal is over I look for a double espresso but it’s too late to get one. Nonsense I think. This is France. There are always cups of espresso and desert to be had. But this isn’t France at all. This is Vietnam. About as far away from France as the United States is.

After dinner I head up to the deck to shoot some pictures alone and just soak in the beauty and serenity of the bay. It’s nice to have a night off from running around and trying to see the whole world. I stay up about as long as I can before heading down to the room to grab some sleep.

Brushstroke
Brushstroke

Aug 17, 2016

Morning arrives. Breakfast is early so I head back up to the main room to grab it.

The plan for the day is to have a beach day on Ti Top Island. There’s also a hike on the island that gives you a good view. The hike and the beach day mostly go to waste as it starts completely down pouring. The Canadian and American teams spend the day only a couple meters up the hike under an overhang talking about life in Toronto and Jersey. We also talk about app and website ideas. It’s still a good time.

After the beach it’s back to the hotel to shower up and pack up. Before leaving my room I snap a picture of the view. It’s a pretty gorgeous view from here.

Hotel views have been great
Hotel views have been great

After we unpack we head back up for a cooking class, which ends up being a simple how to roll a spring roll. It works out well because the chef spends some time making some absurd food art. Here’s a bird he made from a pear. This picture to me sums up a lot of Southeast Asia. Labor is cheap. This is only possible here because that is true. Our chef is also the captain of the boat. It’s another example of not just life on a cruise ship, but life out this way. To have such a variety of skills to make a living is remarkable.

Our boat captain made this
Our boat captain made this

After the cooking class we jam another five-course meal and head off of the boat. It’s kind of a slight chaos when we get off of the boat. There’s a bunch of different busses going back to Hanoi, so we end up being apart from the group that we came out here with. The French couple says goodbye. The Americans and Canadians are sticking together for one more bus ride.

We leave the dock around noon. It’s a four-hour ride to Hanoi. The bus driver sets up a taxi to take at some drop off along the main road. This saves us from heading all the way into the center of the city, which saves us some time in getting to the airport. Halfway into the bus ride we take a rest stop. This includes coffees, fruit juices, pineapples, oreos, and some random citrusy energy type drinks. It’s where we grab this sweet pic.

Squadded up
Squadded up

After the rest stop we get back on the bus. Eventually the drop off for the taxi comes. It’s time to wake up my fellow American and wish him well. I think he’s fallen in love with some massage girl in Hanoi, so I’m sure he’ll be fine in his time there.

I pile into the taxi with my two homies from the 6 (or is it the 9 now) and we head out to the airport. Before we left the docks I booked a ticket out to Ko Phi Phi. On the bus ride they booked a flight out to Laos. I probably should have followed them to Luang Prabang, but I was happy enough cutting out Laos from the trip to try to save time for Australia and New Zealand. I also want to slowly make my way home to get the next part of my life started.

The taxi ride ends quickly. Our time chatting about life and travel is at an end. Finally at the airport we say our goodbyes. What was once four has dwindled back down to one. It was definitely a fun time on the cruise getting to talk with people from all over and making some human connection. It was a nice break after the hours of grinding travel by myself.

My flight is set to depart Hanoi at 8:50 PM and to arrive at Bangkok at 11:00 PM. There’s going to be a layover. It’s a different airlines so I have to grab my bags, go through customs, leave the airport, and then reenter the domestic terminal and go through security and the check-in process again. Sounds rough but it’s not too bad. I grab another night of sleep in the Bangkok airport. It’s now my fourth time in this airport and my second night of sleep here in the last seven days.

Aug 18, 2016

This night of sleep ends up going better than the first time I slept here. I throw in ear buds with some relaxing music that I can turn up loudly enough to drown out the speakers and the absurd travelers that are just screaming conversation amidst a sea of sleeping bodies. I even combat the cold effectively cracking out my down jacket that I had tucked away for the trip. Eventually it’s time to depart Bangkok at 6:45 AM for Krabi to arrive 7:55 AM.

From Krabi it’s a bus ride to the ferry terminal. From the ferry terminal it’s a two-hour ferry ride to Ko Phi Phi. It takes a little while to get here but once I finally do it is all worth it. Ko Phi Phi is a glorious island.

Took a while but I made it
Took a while but I made it

In order to get to my hotel I need to hop on a boat. So that means that it’s time for another boat picture. I’m on a boat.

Sweet boat pic yeaaa
Sweet boat pic yeaaa

Here’s a shot of the beach outside of my hotel. This is about thirty feet from my room. It’s pretty glorious.

My life for the moment
My life for the moment

And a panorama because it’s just so glorious.

Beach almost to myself
Beach almost to myself

I end up spending the day laying out in the sun and hopping into the water to swim. Today is intended to be strictly a rest day. I think about possibly getting a massage later. I head back to the room around dinner time and take a nap. The plan is to wake up to grab dinner, and then possibly grab that massage. But I end up sleeping late and sleeping the rest of the night away. I don’t mind. This day is here to just relax and let myself catch up with everything.

Aug 19, 2016

Night turns to day, and sadly it’s time to slowly make my way out of this heaven. First I grab a breakfast from my hotel.

Views from breakfast
Views from breakfast

After breakfast I take the walk to town. I end up leaving Ko Phi Phi at 1:30 PM for a ferry to Krabi. The ferry gets in around 3:40 PM and the taxi doesn’t get to the airport until my international flight is boarding at 4:30 PM. The flight is supposed to leave at 5:10 PM flight so it looks like I might not be able to make it. Luckily I’m able to cut all of the lines and get on the plane only a few minutes before the doors close. I’m able to arrive 7:35 PM at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It’s only about an hour flight but the time moves head an hour.

So that’s about it. Have a bit more of Southeast Asia to go through and then the decisions will be made about Australia and New Zealand. It’s been a fast paced beautiful whirlwind through Southeast Asia but it’s been incredible so far. I’ve been having the best of time. I’ll have to find out how the Laos path ended up going, but last I heard there were two Canadians riding an elephant through Laos. So I think it’s safe to say both roads would have been fine to take.

A childhood memory comes full circle

A bit of Thailand, a bit of Cambodia

Aug 10, 2016

The flight to Bangkok goes smoothly. It’s the afternoon when I arrive.

It’s another country so it’s time for some new currency. Out here in Thailand $1 US dollar equals about 34 Thai Baht. So an easy way to kind of think about it is 100 Baht is about $3. You pick up the conversions quickly enough.

I’m staying the night at the Sheraton on Sukhumvit Soi 15. I heard Sukhumvit is a good area with lots of restaurants and good transportation to anything that you would want to see in the city. I’m staying at a Sheraton because I’m kind of craving a comfortable American hotel. I need a decent night sleep after the hectic pace of the trip and the previous night sleeping over at the airport.

Taxis from the airport are by meter. It’s nice to not have to haggle for a price. You also choose whether you take toll roads or not. Any chance I can take in my life to purchase time for money I normally take. So toll roads it is.

The drive takes some time. Especially as you get into town. The entire time in Bangkok the traffic was pretty terrible, at all hours.

The ride into Bangkok reveals a quick view of the city. It’s a much bigger place than anything I saw in Myanmar. From the taxi it seems like it has the makings of a good city. A variety of areas and things to see and do. Hustle and bustle. I’m not in the countryside any more.

I eventually arrive at the hotel. Check in goes smoothly and I head in for a nap. A nap ends up being a long sleep. I don’t mind. It’s important to listen to your body on trips like this. Sleep when you have to. Eat and drink when you have to. Sometimes do those things even more than you have to so you can build up reserves. I decide to just sleep until the morning and head out to see the city the following day.

Before I head to bed for good I book a late night flight to Chiang Mai. It’s a destination that seems reasonable based on what’s available. I would have preferred to be in Chiang Mai tonight, but the flights and busses would not allow it. It’s no worries. The itinerary is fluid. It can adapt to what is available and what I feel like doing.

Aug 11, 2016

Morning arrives. And with it a sense of exploration. I check out of the hotel and drop my bag off so I don’t have to lug it around the city.

The plan is to walk from Sukhumvit Soi 15 all the way to Wat Pho. That’s about an hour forty five of walking. It’s a long ways away. But I like walking in new cities. It let’s me easily stop for anything that catches my eye. It let’s me get to know the city a bit more personally.

The plan is to get some Thai food. And street Thai food. Thailand is known for having some of the best street food available so I will be happy to try some out.

My first stop on the walk is a market that I saw on the taxi ride the day before. Yesterday they were selling some delicious looking lobsters and other seafood. Today that spot is peddling some other sort of food. This stuff looks pretty good. It’s some sort of fried cube that’s being sold for 30 Baht, which is about $1 USD. Business is simple out here. In this picture you can see the chef cooking up, the sales woman, the guy who gets paid but just stands there doing nothing, and the two customers. You can even see the Baht being exchanged.

Give me the Baht
Give me the Baht

Up close this stuff looks as follows. It’s like a fried dough cube that might have seaweed in it. It’s drizzled in sauce. It’s very filling, which is saying a lot, as I haven’t eaten in quite some time.

This will do

I continue the walk and pick up some drinks. It’s rather hot out and I have a lot of walking to do today. The mountain dew in Thailand is the best I’ve ever had. It’s a different blend of ingredients out here for sure.

I continue the walk. Past the hookers, the lady boys, and the massage girls. It’s about noontime, and business is open. Throughout the walk, especially as day turns to night, this scene only increases in its frequency.

I make my way off of the street and up onto the elevated walkway. This walkway is a good way to avoid the bustle of the streets, stay out of the sun and rain, and grab access to some public transportation options. I love the architecture of all of these transportation methods all intertwined in the same area.

Bangkok views
Bangkok views

And to get a better look at the whole mess of moving around in Bangkok, here’s a panorama.

Many ways to travel in Bangkok
Many ways to travel in Bangkok

Sometimes I like the elevated view of the walkway and carry along on my walk on it. And sometimes I want to see the city down at the level of the street. As I’m waiting to cross a road some twenty-year-old kid strikes up a conversation. People along my travels have been pretty willing just to start giving you advice about the city or asking you simple questions. I think a lot of these people are just practicing their English, but I don’t mind, as the info gained is beneficial to me.

He lets me know to avoid going straight as there is a demonstration up ahead. He says to check out the Lucky Buddha, the tall Buddha, and Wat Pho. Apparently you can grab an open-air tuk tuk for 30 Baht. It’s a promotion put on by some suit factory. The purpose I think is to grab the cheap ride and then at the end you have someone trying to sell you suits. But the kid also says the deal is in honor of the Queen’s birthday tomorrow. He says there will be fireworks tomorrow. I won’t be in town, but it’s an interesting foreshadowing to some bombings that are about to rock some of Thailand’s popular tourists spots later tonight and the following night, including Bangkok itself. Yes there was a bombing in Bangkok the day I was here, but so goes life. You can’t avoid this stuff no matter how much you follow the news. I hear news of this from my family who gets in touch with me the following day asking if I’m alright. I am alright, and I plan to swing back through some of those other previously bombed areas, depending on the pulse of the news.

I turn down the offer for the tuk tuk ride trying to complete this walk. Eventually after about another mile I have to give in and take a ride. The sun is too strong. The exhaust fumes are too brutal. I have a guy give me a drive to Wat Pho. I’m skipping the lucky Buddha and tall Buddha. The guy wants to charge me 200 Baht but I tell him about the special that’s supposed to be run. We kind of get into an argument and he asks another tuk tuk driver for help to resolve the issues. He’s unwilling to be the mediator. I don’t really have much of a choice but to pay the price, which ends up being 150 Baht. It’s only about $5 US dollar so no real reason to even argue about it. I learn as the trip goes on to negotiate quickly, and a lot of the times just leave money on the table. Better for the driver to have an extra dollar or two and avoid the stress. It will make a difference to his life a lot more than it will to mine. When I get out I talk to the tuk tuk driver who didn’t want to mediate. Both him and another security guard later in the day agree the fare should have been 30 Baht. I got ripped off, no worries.

Tuk tuk life
Tuk tuk life

Here’s a view facing the rear of the tuk tuk. I don’t often take many pictures of myself when traveling. Usually when you look back on pictures you appreciate the ones which include you or your friends or family the most. For me I don’t gain much in showing people that I’ve been to places. I’d much rather get a better shot of where I am or what I’m trying to get into. I also kind of really hate all the selfie sticks whizzing in the air and horrible pictures that so many tourists spend so much effort on getting. Take a picture and move along. Don’t sit in the better picture spots and waste everyone’s time taking fifty really bad pictures of the same thing. I’ve kind of learned to just avoid the more popular views and look for angles of things that no one is taking pictures of. It’s a lot more rewarding to get a good shot of something that no one else is interested in.

Selfie time
Selfie time

The price for Wat Pho is 100 Baht. Most of these temples have fairly reasonable entrance fees. Prices are usually around the $3 US dollar for this one. One of the things that people like to check out is the enormous lying down Buddha. This thing is huge. It stretched the entire length of the building and all the way to the ceiling.

Just resting
Just resting

There’s a lot of gold out this way in Southeast Asia. I love the depth of it on this Buddha.

Do it for the gram
Do it for the gram

And these painted ceilings rival some of the beautiful painting religious walls of Europe.

This goes on forever
This goes on forever

It starts down pouring while I’m there. I wait it out a couple minutes, which is fine, as I’m still gassed from the miles I’ve walked today. Even when I get outside to put my socks and shoes back on I take my time. I sit for about ten or fifteen minutes just relaxing and charging back up. I love these little breaks throughout the day. It’s a simple way to charge back up, take a moment to clear the mind, and make plans for what to do next.

Every corner of these temples has something to see. You just wander around and explore. Statues like these are everywhere. There are smaller versions of all sizes available for sale at many stores in town. Religion is very prevalent here. I’m not sure if I notice it because I’m new to the area, but it seems everyone everywhere is burning candles, incense, or praying at either some large popular temple or some random tiny little temple on a street corner or down an alley.

Pretty good posture
Pretty good posture

The inside of Wat Pho is again completely gorgeous. A lot of time people are just trying to snap a selfie or just walking through and looking at the higher-level view of the area. But there is stunning beauty in the details. Those pillars, the area behind the Buddha, the walls are all incredibly painted. Religious buildings like these always seem so absurd to me. The amount of hours and work that goes into building something like this is completely insane.

I need tall ceilings
I need tall ceilings

After checking out the views I stroll back out to the streets. I want to see the Royal Palace but it’s closed today. It’s no longer in use these days but it still looks extremely extravagant. It’s behind a wall so you can’t even get a good view of it. I talk with a security guard who recommends I instead go to see tall Buddha, happy Buddha, and the silk factory. He waves down a tuk tuk for me and I politely tell him I’m alright. Yea, 30 Baht for the drive. I’ve heard this story before.

I’m starving and I need some more food. I start the walk back and keep an eye out for Thai street food and any Thai restaurant that looks popular. One of the first things I grab is a fried chicken leg and a fried chicken finger on a stick. They cost a total of about $1 US. The leg is some of the best fried chicken I’ve ever had. This area of the world is expert in their frying techniques. Everything that comes out of the oil is brilliant. Perfect. Battered. Crisped. Whatever you’re eating that is fried is done so to perfection.

I walk through markets and shops and on the street and back up the skyway. As I get closer to the hotel my options for food are running out. I eventually even pass the hotel. I get about as far as Sukhumvit seems to go. I order pork on a stick and a spicy sausage from a cart. It might not look like the safest bet but the food is moving, even at this late rainy hour.

Questionable street food
Questionable street food

I retreat to the hotel, completely drained after maybe a dozen miles of walking. I grab my bag and a taxi out to the airport. The taxi ride involves more traffic, even at this hour after 10 PM at night. The town is starting to get nice and questionable. The stands that used to sell shoes and trinkets have switched over to stands selling sex toys and some questionable looking body building drugs. Alcohol carts have been rolled out onto the streets so I guess you can just get drinks on the streets. More hookers. It’s about to be a crazy night.

My taxi eventually takes me out of these scenes to the airport. The lighting here is bright enough to perform surgery. The noise level and constant announcements do not go away. I lay down on a row of seats and nod off, stealing whatever hours of sleep I can.

Aug 12, 2016

Morning comes. Or just an extension of the previous night. I’m in and out of sleep. Eventually I’m able to check my bag. The flight to Chiang Mai goes smoothly. So far all of my flights have been fine.

I get to Chiang Mai around 8 in the morning. I grab a ride to the hotel hoping to check in early. I’m not allowed to because the room isn’t ready, but the receptionist lets me drop off my bag and go explore. First I need food and a coffee since I’m beat.

I find a place that has everything I couldn’t find in Bangkok, plus the things I need to get this day started. It’s a meal sent down from the buddhas. Double espresso to stay awake. Pad thai. And tom yam kung soup. Tom yam (or tom yum as it’s often spelled back home) is one of my favorite bowls of soup. It’s often a must for me at every Thai restaurant. It’s alright here but the pad thai is the star.

Pad thai
Pad thai

Another city, another bunch of temples to see. I decide on heading to Wat Phra Singh first. It’s 20 Baht entry. There’s a huge Buddha here just as there is at all of these temples. But I’m much more drawn to the smaller details of the temple. I’m trying to find beauty and explore areas that don’t often get viewed by the majority of people. Some of the patterns and colors are pretty beautiful.

Patterns and colors
Patterns and colors

You see stuff like this when you keep your eyes peeled.

Oh hey guys
Oh hey guys

Wat Phra Singh has a smaller personal feel. It doesn’t feel as extravagant as some of the temples that I have seen but it is beautiful. There are a lot of things you will notice if you pay attention. I love the illusion of this elephant. It’s only half an elephant but in the reflection you can see the other half. You can even see the tail even though it’s not there.

Elephant magic
Elephant magic

There’s a lot to see and a lot of good angles to shoot and capture here.

An infinite amount of pictures
An infinite amount of pictures

There’s an peaceful area where they have some Buddhist sayings. I normally hate cheesy quotes like this one, but I like this quote. I’ll leave it open to interpretation for you.

I just want to be great
I just want to be great

After touring Wat Phra Singh, I’m off to Wat Chedi Luang. Entrance is again a modest 40 Baht. Again the massive Buddhas and beautiful buildings are worth seeing. But the smaller details are what I’m drawn to.

Animals and stuff
Animals and stuff

Some of this stuff is pretty magical looking.

Magic stuff
Magic stuff

The outside has an older temple. It’s like a ruin that is in the middle of the city.

Casual
Casual

I sat on a bench for a while here just taking a break from all the traveling and temples. After about fifteen minutes or so I was charged back up and ready to get up and keep moving. Before I did I snapped this picture of these buildings that were the backdrop for my rest. I wasn’t expecting to like this picture so much afterwards, so I apologize for the people. I didn’t spend any time putting this picture together. I was literally about to get up and just said, oh that looks kind of cool. Let me snap a single pic from the bench. It puts into perspective the cool stuff out here that you get tired of seeing after a while.

Architecture on fleek
Architecture on fleek

Finally time comes to check into the hotel. I swing back and finally am able to check in. It’s nice to have been able to see some sights of the city but I’m beat and I really need that sleep.

Sleep goes well and by the time I wake up it’s time to head out for dinner. I stroll about the city. Everyone in the world is playing Pokemon. It’s a bit weird. I walk through a town square and I have to avoid running into all these people on their phones. People are driving cars slowly on the streets playing. The driver and the three passengers are all doing it. It can’t be the safest but it seems to work.

I finally find a place selling some delicious Thai food. I’m pretty hungry so I order a ton of food. A coffee, fried pork bites, pork fried rice, some chicken and crab rolls, and another bowl of tom yam. This time the tom yam is perfect. It’s one of the dishes that I came to this part of the world for and I couldn’t be happier with it.

I came to SEA for bowls like this
I came to SEA for bowls like this

At dinner a German girl asks to sit with me. We end up talking about life and all sorts of stuff. She wants to go to school for philosophy, so the conversation gets pretty deep. The takeaway for me is that I probably end up spending too much time thinking or waiting for a perfect opportunity when in reality I have to just jump in and go for things. Make a decision and run with it. If you know me you probably have told me this at some point. I mostly agree with her analysis of my life and plan to take it with me after I return back from the trip.

We close the place out. Staff tries to kick us out. We have to leave. We part ways. We wish each other well. No kisses though. She says that’s for the Spanish and the French or something. Germans say goodbye with some pat on the back thing. All good with me.

I definitely am American when I travel. It’s nice to be American. That’s how I feel back home, but when you’re back home everyone wants to know I guess where your parents or grandparents came from. In the States a lot of people look at me more as Polish, which is weird because I’m definitely American. But so it goes.

Another night of sleep awaits. Before I can do that I need to book the next day. I decide on Angkor Wat over Luang Prabang. For me Angkor is a must visit on this trip. Luang Prabang gets tons of praise but I think I’ll be passing on it on this trip. I decide the pace and itinerary is probably a bit too much so I decided to slow things down and chop out a couple destinations going forward. There’s no direct flight so tomorrow will consist of two flights.

Aug 13, 2016

Today ends up being mostly a travel day. After last nights decision to slow down I’m feeling a lot better about travel. I know I’ll be able to enjoy it and get the most out of it now. I understand how to operate out here and know I’ll be able to solve any problems that arise without much stress.

This is tested early on in the day. The hotel lobby is closed. I can’t check out. I was counting on them getting a taxi to the airport for me. I’m already a bit late leaving the hotel but I’m not the least bit stressed. I slot the key in the door to the lobby. I start walking to the airport. I know for sure I’ll find a ride along the way. Either taxi, tuk tuk, hitch hiking or walking as a worst case scenario. Within maybe three minutes I have a tuk tuk ride that costs about $3 US dollar. I don’t know how I knew that there would be a ride waiting for me, but I did. This is a great feeling. Faced with unknown situations or problems I’ll be able to operate without stress and get done what I have to.

The two flights involve a flight back down to Bangkok and then out to Siem Reap, which is the jump off spot for Angkor Wat. The first flight back to Bangkok is without issue. As is the second to Siem Reap. I land, leaving Thailand behind me for a moment and enter Cambodia. I’ll only be here for a day, but it houses one of the must view sights for me.

I eventually get to the hotel. Or the resort rather. It’s a five star rated place. Pools. Swim up bars. Restaurants. Good service. All that stuff. I feel I need a decent rest after the pace I’ve been going. There seems to be a lot of these types of resort hotels out here. I’m not sure I can recommend them. They are what they are. I’d much prefer to be in a central location, but today I needed a rest. I spend the night at the hotel sleeping and relaxing. I book a flight to Da Nang, Vietnam for 7:25 PM the following night to be able to check out Hoi An. I want to be up early the following day to see Angkor Wat.

Aug 14, 2016

Morning brings a pretty good complimentary breakfast. There is some decent Western style food but you really have to get the local (or at least local to this general area of the world) food here. A bowl of pork soup. Soba noodles. These soba noodles are delicious. The fact that this is hotel food is a testament to the delicious food that Asia knows how to provide.

Soba, even at a Cambodian hotel
Soba, even at a Cambodian hotel

Freshly fueled up I get a tuk tuk to Angkor. Everyone here takes the US dollar, which is new to me. The first price they tell you is US dollar. You kind of have to ask to pay in Cambodian. Both are accepted. The drivers are hard bargainers. Like the guy the day before who drove me from the airport. I turned down a tour to see Angkor from him and he stormed off yelling how he thought Americans were nice people but obviously he was wrong. His outburst seemed childish. When it happened to me I wanted to say something to him but bit my tongue. I’m sorry I don’t want to buy whatever good or service you are selling. In this case something overpriced and not worth it to me. I make apps and websites and do engineering for a living but you don’t see me all upset that you don’t want to buy what I do for a living. That transaction annoyed me, but so it goes.

It’s ultra hot out when I get to Angkor. But it’s worth the heat and dealing with the tourists to see the sites. Angkor is a great place.

Welcome to Angkor Wat
Welcome to Angkor Wat

I’m going to just include some more pictures here than I normally might because these write-ups take a while to get done and pictures can tell a bit more in less of a period of time.

I made it
I made it

There are a lot of places to explore. Taking a turn away from the selfie stick yielding tourists gives you a part of the temple all to yourself.

A step away from the tourists
A step away from the tourists

This next picture is one of the most important of my life. I was getting ready to shoot this picture of Angkor and at that moment a flock of birds flew into the shot. I couldn’t believe it. The birds have been symbolic of flight and freedom, which for me are the perfect symbol of travel. You fly, and then you land in a destination where you have been planning on going to. It was an amazing moment.

Birds, the ultimate symbol of travel
Birds, the ultimate symbol of travel

I’m actually just lying about the birds. They’re not symbolic of anything, ha.

After Angkor I took a short ride to nearby Ta Prohm. Ta Prohm is in all seriousness an important place for me to visit. It’s a place where trees eat temples. I’ve always been fascinated that the earth will eventually eat the world that we have created. All of our greatest successes, all of our greatest accomplishments, our great pieces of engineering. Our palaces, our temples, our garbage dumps. All of it will be consumed and returned to the earth.

I remember seeing a picture of a tree growing out over a temple when I was a child and that image has stuck with me. It was in a copy of National Geographic that my grandma had at her house when I was maybe 8 or 10 years old. I thought it was so cool. That image sticks out in my memory. Something about it was so awe inspiring. It was magic. It wasn’t what was supposed to happen. We were supposed to take the tree, kill it, and build the temple. And here was this tree like nahhh, that’s not happening. I will kill your temple. I will build myself up. I think I’ve seen shots of this tree and temple in various places afterwards throughout the years, but I’m not sure.

Regardless, I was here, at the destination of this childhood memory. I was at that tree. I never in a million years would have thought as a child that I would have been able to find and see that tree. I haven’t really thought about it much since I saw it 20 years ago, but here it was. I was standing in front of the tree. Somehow, some way, this small moment from my childhood came full circle. I can’t really explain the feeling. But yea that happened. For real. No lies.

A childhood memory comes full circle
A childhood memory comes full circle

Some of you who have seen the Tomb Raider movie with Angelina Jolie will know this setting from that movie. It was shot here. It’s easy to see how strolling about the area that you could start immediately letting your mind wander. A movie producer might easily be inspired to create a movie based on the area. An artist might be inspired by the lighting and adventure of the place. An architect might be inspired by designs that honor the interconnectivity of manmade and natural elements. Regardless, there are some cool shots here.

Trees are dope out here
Trees are dope out here

Exploring tombs.

Pretty lit
Pretty lit

After spending time at Ta Prohm I swing back to the hotel. I spend some time going through pictures for the blog. I repack my gear and swing out of the hotel for my flight to Vietnam. My time in Cambodia was a quick one, but I’m thrilled with being able to have see Angkor.

It’s been a tiring and stressful couple days. Throughout it I’ve learned how to operate and travel without the initial stress that was accompanying my early days here. The comfort and beautiful life of Southeast Asia is seeping into me and allowing me to really enjoy my time here. I’ll be in Vietnam for a couple days before swinging down off of the mainland onto the long strip of islands and continuing my journey south and east towards Australia and New Zealand. I’m not sure if I’ll have the stamina and desire to add those destinations to the trip, but I wouldn’t mind being able to hop in a car and have two of the best road trip experiences of my life. We shall see.

I’ve missed home for sure but there’s a lot more for me to see and do here before I can return. I hope everyone back home and everyone on travels all around the world is having the greatest of times.

Ridiculously stunning, captivating

Myanmar: An introduction to Southeast Asia

Aug 04, 2016

Eastward I went. Far, far eastward. Across the Atlantic. Passing over the UK. Past Western Europe, my last great adventure. Past Eastern Europe, an adventure for another day. Eventually to the Middle East, an area that has been growing in appreciation in my heart. Into the desert. The rich sands and haze of Qatar.

Aug 05, 2016

It had taken me 12 hours to get here from New York City. I wish I had something poignant to say about such a travel. The flight was beautifully uneventful. In a world where everything is taken for granted, I have few words. I just flew on a $300 million dollar piece of magic. An engineering marvel that would shatter your brain if you could fathom the intricacies of it all.

I watched Big Hero 6 off of a recommendation. That movie will give kids a false sense of inventing in a way that any Disney princess movie gives kids a false sense of love and life.

I watched Casablanca. It’s still rated as one of the best moves of all time and I had to see why. Classics are classics for a reason. I enjoyed this movie a lot more than I thought I would have. It’s a bit absurd, but it’s a bit beautiful.

I sat in the airport in Qatar for about three hours. The sun was setting when I left New York, and the sun was setting again here.

Onto another plane I went. Eastward still. Across India, until finally my destination approached. Myanmar. Or Burma as some people might still call it. Yes, they are the same place. No, Burma is not some island. For me, it’s the entry point and the introduction into Southeast Asia.

Aug 06, 2016

Beautifully complicated, Myanmar is a place that was pretty much off limits for travel only a few short years ago. It all started in 2007 with 100,000 monks. They weren’t happy. And when you manage to mobilize that many peaceful warriors, you are in for a fun time. Fighting in the streets. Revolution. The entire country was flipped upside down, just as I would be by visiting it.

Twenty-two hours. Somewhere around 9,000 miles of flying. Finally my adventure could begin.

The first stop was Yangon, the capital. I had arrived at about 6 AM in the morning. Saturday morning. I boarded my first flight in New York around 10 PM, on Thursday night. We all have Friday nights that we can’t remember, but in my case it feels like this day never existed.

Eventually I made it through customs, picked up some local currency and grabbed a taxi to my hotel. The city passes me by as the driver maneuvers through traffic, beeping at anyone he feels the right too. I think it’s a beautiful city with a lot of character. Some people would probably say it’s too gritty. I think it’s a very truthful place. Its presence would go on to charm me.

I check in early to the hotel. It’s the rainy season. Everyone seems to point this put to me. I want to go out and explore, as there seems to be a break in the weather. I decide to nap first which eventually leads to a long sleep. I wake up around 5 PM and decide to quickly get a move on to go check out what the town has to offer.

The weather ends up being fine for the night. There are some showers, but never anything more. I thought the rainy season would be a lot worse, but I think it really just makes you appreciate the fine weather. If you can’t enjoy life with bad weather, then feel free to be held back from a good time. Feel free to be miserable. Or move to San Diego or something.

The first stop is Shwedagon Pagoda. It’s a short walk from the hotel. I start walking on the sidewalks before I kind of realize they don’t exist and join the locals on the road. Cars have the right of way, but you kind of just use your brain and follow other people. You quickly get the feel for how to operate. In general when you’re in a new place, just follow along. It will get you to a point where you can start to think and make decisions for yourself.

The cloudiness of the night mixed with the fogging of my camera lens. My lens was sitting in an air-conditioned room. Out in the real world it gave me problems until it adapted to the temperature. I didn’t really notice it too much at the time of this picture. And I didn’t really mind. I was just absorbing everything on the walk. Even when I eventually go to the pagoda I didn’t really want to shoot pictures. The new sights had consumed me, and I gave into them.

The streets of Myanmar consumed me
The streets of Myanmar consumed me

There are lots of little stores and carts and setups of all different kinds. Many of the practices would be against many of the rules back home. Things are just different here. It seems to work well enough.

I passed about a dozen stray dogs on the walk over. They all look the same. Just a different color. They’re also really smart. They wait for cars and sprint across the road. They stay clear of people. They eat every single scrap of food that hasn’t been consumed. They kind of are like pigeons in New York or seagulls down the Jersey shore. They are just kind of there. Part of the scenery. They don’t really bother you. No one pays them any mind.

You can’t wear shoes to see this Shwedagon Pagoda. No socks either. You need long pants as well. Respect and whatnot. Walking the wet stone floor is another little indication that I am not home. This is how things are done out here.

The pagoda is breathtaking. Honestly. I went into this trip really wanting to shoot some good pictures. But the sights of the street have consumed me, and the beauty of the pagoda had rendered my photography skills useless. There are some incredible shots here, but I wasn’t able to capture them as I had wanted. I walked around in awe of the place. How different. How beautiful. As the cathedrals are to Western Europe, I feel so too will the temples of Southeast Asia be for me.

Ridiculously stunning, captivating
Ridiculously stunning, captivating

Even though it’s rainy season, there are a fair amount of people here, but its not overwhelming. There’s a mix of tourists and worshippers of all different levels. I thought this picture of these people lighting candles gave me an interesting perspective. Religion is kind of religion everywhere. In Myanmar you might be a Buddhist. Back in the states you might be Christian. So much of what vehemently believe in are truths or ideas that were given to us based on such unexplainable things like where we were born.

Worshippers at Shwedagon Pagoda
Worshippers at Shwedagon Pagoda

After walking about the pagoda I strolled off. I wanted to walk to the Chinatown area because there was supposed to be some good bbq on 19th street. I like walking when I’m in new places. It gives you a great perspective and time to look around and process the place. It let’s you discover new things about a place. It gives you some much needed exercise on the road. Unfortunately the walk was a bit uneventful. It was mostly along a wide road.

There are several streets and vendors all over the Chinatown area. 19th Street was alive with a mix of vendors, and places to sit down and grab some food and drink. It looks like this. It’s a reminder again that I’m so far away from home. This place has all of the essentials that you would want back home, but it just looks a bit different.

Streets of Yangon
Streets of Yangon

I settle for a location that is crowded. My plan for the trip is to sometimes reference reviews online, but often just find places that are crowded or look good and venture in. I don’t normally post pictures of menus or anything but I have to in this case. Both the drink menu and the food menu. Keep in mind when looking at these menus that $1 US dollar is equivalent to about 1200 Myanmar kyat. So yea, that gin and tonic or mojito you want is 75 cents.

Absurd prices
Absurd prices

Chicken wings are about $2.50. Beef kabobs for the same. Egg fried rice for a buck twenty. Stuff is pretty cheap here for sure.

Not bad at all
Not bad at all

I grab a Myanmar Black Shield stout. I wasn’t expected such a delicious stout to appear and certainly not for $1.75.

Pretty good stout
Pretty good stout

I ask for a table for 1 and was sat at a table of one Japanese guy who is living in Myanmar and three locals. Everyone at the table is very friendly. The Japanese gentleman strikes up conversation. He went to New York to try to make it in broadway several times. But he chose a life as a guitar instructor. The three guys from Myanmar were friendly. The one I spoke with the most gave me his card and told me to have the authorities call him if I got myself into trouble. I’m not sure how useful that will be, but he seems nice. He says I look like Jason Bourne and asks me if I’m on a secret mission. I laugh, I may be on a personal mission here for sure, but I doubt it will be as glamorous as Bourne’s. I hope parts of it can be as exciting though. He says Myanmar is a great place. I agree with what I’ve seen so far. He says everyone wants to talk to tourists but they are afraid their English isn’t good enough. I think that it’s a lot better than my understanding of the local language.

Dinner ends up going well. It gives me the obvious comfort that I will be able to find food and drink on this trip. Everyone has to eat and drink, so it should be obvious that it won’t be a problem to find such necessities. But I guess sometimes when you are planning a trip back in the comfort of your home you want to have that comfort that you will be able to both survive and enjoy it.

The walk back to the hotel is along a different road. It too mostly follows a major road. You pass some rats from time to time but they are nowhere near the size of the ones I once saw in New Orleans. At times I’m thinking it might be worth it to grab one of the many taxis that beeps at me or pulls up and asks me if I need a ride. But I’m happy to have the opportunity to explore.

I book the next night of the trip. A flight to and a hotel in Inle Lake. Sleep goes well but at about 5 in the morning I no longer can sleep. I flick the lights on to grab my computer to figure maybe I’ll go through some pictures. It’s at this point I’m tested for the first time with my accommodations. So far the hotel has been great. Everything is nice and clean and comfortable. So when I see a cockroach I have a decision. Be irrational and let it ruin my life, or accept that the world has bugs and carry on. How you approach bugs probably says a lot about who you are, and whether you would enjoy or hate a trip out here. I’m not entirely convinced these are worse than the silverfish we have at home, but they might be. As long as they’re not going to kill me with a slew of diseases like mosquiteos or be a nuisance like bed bugs (my luck will eventually run out with these), then I’m probably fine. I put a glass around it to let housekeeping handle it in the morning and snap a picture to present here so that you may find out what type of person you are lol.

Eww gross, haha not really
Eww gross, haha not really

Aug 07, 2016

Morning eventually comes and with it a stop for a breakfast dish I have heard is a must try it Yangon. Mohinga is a noodle soup made of fish stock. Add some cilantro, lemon, chili flakes, a slew of mystery spices and ingredients, and you have a bowl of magic. Couple that with chicken puff pastries that completely destroy anything I’ve ever gotten anywhere in my life. Imagine you’re eating a cloud. Add a cup of tea that has probably thousands of years of tinkering with the blend of ingredients. And a lychee soda because you may as well, and you have one of the most beautiful breakfasts of your life. Each bite a great experience in itself. An amazing meal in so many ways. And of course all for about $2 US dollar.

Breakfast and pillowy amazingness
Breakfast and pillowy amazingness

After breakfast I pack up my bag, then repack it because it doesn’t fit just right. I’m quickly figuring out the best way to pack this bag. I think I have it down. A quick taxi and I arrive back at the airport to catch an hour flight to Inle Lake. My journey includes a lot of these short flights. Apparently they are preferable to the disastrously long bus rides, which take you often uncomfortably the same distance in 8-12 hours. I’m sure I’ll figure out how to travel this area soon enough.

The flight to Inle Lake goes well. Again I have to check my bag. It seems like unless you go ultra light with something like a 22-liter pack, you will always have to check your bag, whether it’s on a flight or a bus ride.

Inle Lake is about an hour taxi from the airport. I try to find someone to split the cab with since everyone is going to the same direction. After a couple minutes I partner up with a girl from Madrid. We bounce back and forth between talking in broken English and Spanish. This is her seventh trip to Southeast Asia, and likely will be her last. There are new adventures ahead for her. She’s thinking Cuba to play and learn music. Seems like a reasonable play.

I show her my itinerary and she says it’s impossible. She says it’s too fast and I should slow down the pace. I’m not entirely convinced but she offers a lot of other valuable information about my trails that lie ahead. She gives me a list of places to check out, most of which I’m already going to, and others that just couldn’t make the cut.

The drive to Nyaung Shwe, the main city near Inle Lake, is a beautiful one. The flight has brought me into a region that has some mountains and also so flat open areas. If you’re not careful you may run into a water buffalo. They are some pretty cool looking creatures.

The road to Inle Lake
The road to Inle Lake

We get to a checkpoint, which the girl assures me she read is legitimate, and we have to fork over 12,500 kyats for a one-week pass for the Inle zone. It’s in addition to the 12,500 we each end up paying to split the cab.

We finally get into town and end up going to a hotel she’s trying to stay at. She doesn’t like it for some reason so she asks the driver to take her to another one. The taxi driver tells her the one she wants is dirty and instead drives her to a place that he recommends. She doesn’t want to see it and so the taxi driver, who is a bit upset at this point, takes her to the other hotel she wants. It does look pretty dirty but she says she’ll stay there and figure it out. We wish each other safe travels.

The taxi driver finally can take me to my hotel. Hotel Brilliant. What a name I’m thinking. The taxi driver says it is a very nice hotel. It ends up being one of the favorite hotels I’ve ever stayed at. The service is really amazing. It has a resort vibe to it almost. I doubt I’ll ever stay at a better hotel for $32 US dollar. Even the rain has seemed to subside, and I’m greeted with a rainbow.

Views
Views

The only negative is that there is no wifi available. But it’s not a strike against the hotel. Rather the main internet connection to the town is broken. Apparently it has been for about four days. There’s only one working atm in the entire town.

Without internet access I have no idea where to head to for dinner. Or where and how I’m going to my next destination tomorrow. But I’m sure I’ll be able to figure it out. The hotel recommends a place named One Owl Grill. It’s an eight-minute bike ride to the center of downtown. The hotel let’s you borrow bikes for free. I haven’t exactly ridden too many bikes lately, just occasionally in Asbury, but I get back on my way. It’s dark out. I’m trying my best to drive a straight line and stick to the traffic pattern, which is to mostly do whatever you think you can get away with. It’s not too busy but I’m being passed my mopeds and taxis. I may have ran a red light in front of a group of police officers. I don’t hear anyone call for me to stop so I guess I’m in the clear. It’s a great feeling riding this bike. I’m in the middle of darkness passing stray dogs in some country halfway around the world that I mostly knew nothing about only a few short days ago when I was planning for this trip. The wind whips past me and the darkness allows me to blend in with all the other people. I feel in that moment like I belong. I’ve tricked the city under my mask of darkness and I’m no longer a Westerner. I just am. Entirely free of everything. No connection to my life 9,000 miles away. No connection to anything but the present moment.

I see the restaurant approach and I park the bike and head inside. There seems to be only tourists here, a group of twenty and thirty year olds. It’s a mix of backpackers and hippies, couples and groups. People seem to know each other a bit. For food I get a chicken fried rice with egg and some chicken and garlic skewers and grab a Mandalay and a Myanmar beer.

I watch the world pass before me. The chaotic scenes of town. The interactions of the tourists. It’s a beautiful night. The pace here is much more relaxed than in Yangon. Even the country dogs differ from the city dogs in the same way people do. They’re a lot more relaxed. They’re not as nose down and deliberate like the city dogs, who are probably off to some meeting that their project manager called to discuss the productivity of acquiring scraps from the various locations around the city.

The meal is nice and relaxing. It gives me confidence that I will be able to not just get through the itinerary, but to have enough time to enjoy the travels and time to be in the moment and enjoy the trip. Let us die young or let us live forever plays in the background at some point.

It seems about time to head out. The town has quieted down a bit. I somewhat want to hop on the bike and keep exploring but I decide to head back to the hotel with since I want to be up early to check out the lake. It’s probably the right call. Those two beers gave me the confidence to crank the bike into the sixth gear. I’m now keeping a steady pace with the mopeds. The eight-minute ride turns into about a four-minute ride. I pull into the hotel and there’s about three staff there to take the bike from me.

I head to my room to sleep. It goes well but I can’t sleep the best. At a certain point in the night I just wake up. For the last two nights I’ve brewed up a cup of coffee and got to work on some of the pictures I’ve been taking. I give one last late push for some more sleep before the alarm clock will ring.

Aug 08, 2016

In the morning I grab breakfast at the hotel. Less than $3 for a plate of delicious fruit, unlimited tea, four pieces of toast, two eggs, then another two eggs because I looked hungry, a slice of frittata, an almond cookie, there may have been more. I was stuffed though.

The hotel books a tour of the lake for me for 18,000 kyat. It includes a ride to and from the boat. The ride also is the person who told me about that one working atm, and stops along the ride so I can withdraw money. It also is a tour that is only for me. I thought I would be put in a group but it’s just me and my own private captain. He takes me to the sights of the lake and let’s me come and go at my own pace.

I love these textures and colors
I love these textures and colors

The lake is beautiful. Mountains on both sides. Wide and open in the middle. There’s a lot of commerce going on here. Traditional fisherman. Harvesting of various sea plants. The transportation of goods such as fruits and bags of what could be rice. Of course the transportation of the newest commercial venture which is the tourists themselves.

Fisherman at Inle Lake
Fisherman at Inle Lake

The tour takes you to a bunch of traditional workshops where you can see how local goods are made and you can purchase them afterwards. They show you how to make silver jewelry or the actual boats you see being used on the lake. If this was another part of the world this might feel scammy, but a lady trying to sell you a local scarf that is actually made in that country is being pretty honest. The goods for sale at these places are actually a pretty good quality.

These little fishies
These little fishies

They also have the ladies who wear the neck rings.

Do it for the gram
Do it for the gram

There’s a Buddhist temple on the lake. After seeing Shwedagon Pagoda I’m not really impressed. I mean sure it’s in the middle of a lake. But Shwedagon was awe inspiring and captivating. Shwedagon also had really clean floors. This temple I have to take my shoes off again. But they throw food around to let pigeons shit all over the place. I’m not sure why animals get a pass to be disrespectful, but I don’t make any of these rules.

Every picture with a boat in it
Every picture with a boat in it

Eventually we had back. I’m pretty beat from the sun and lack of food and water and the amount of stores we went into. When we get back my friend who dropped me off is there to pick me up. I ask him about heading to Bagan. He says it should be a good time to go. It might be muddy, but not too much rain.

When we get back to the hotel he orders me up some chicken fried rice with egg. The hotel staff brings me a fruit plate and they also bring over a large bottle of water. As I’m eating the hotel staff figures out how to get to Bagan and how I can book a hotel with the internet down.

Apparently there are no flights tonight, but they book a bus for 7 PM. It’s 18,000 and should take five and a half hours. It will give me an idea for how I feel about these bus trips compared to flying.

I finish my lunch. The hotel gets some kind of arrangement to get me a tablet that’s connected to the internet. I’m able to book my hotel for the night in Bagan. It’s sad to know that it won’t be another night at this gem of a hotel I’m currently at.

At this point it’s after 2 PM. I checked out before I went on the tour but the hotel let me keep my bag there. I know have to stick around until 7. I somewhat don’t want to head into town as I’m a bit tired. I guess the staff can see. One of the girls escorts me up to the top floor that I didn’t even know existed. She says I need to rest.

The view up here is beautiful. As I’m sitting she brings over a pillow and a mat to lay on. Seems pretty good. She also brings over a tray of these snacks, another bottle of water, and a full pot of tea, all complimentary. I enjoy that and end up napping off and on, waking to watch the clouds pass.

Relaxation
Relaxation

This relaxation time was amazing. It felt good that faced with some questions about how the trip would go that this is what would end up happening. It seems that there will be a lot of these pauses in the trip where there is time that must be passed. I hope they are all as enjoyable and amazing as this.

Seriously getting it in
Seriously getting it in

Eventually the time comes for the bus ride. But not before a dinner of chicken fried rice and these fried vegetable fritters from a restaurant right across the street. Those fritters were gorgeous. Excellent use of delicious ingredients.

Fried deliciousness
Fried deliciousness

A quick stop back at the hotel and the bus arrives. I say goodbye to about ten people that made my time there amazing. I’m actually a bit sad to part ways. I just want to take that hotel and its people with me.

A five and a half hour bus ride should put me at my destination at half past midnight. That’s not too bad. It should give me enough time to get a decent night of sleep before venturing out. This is my first time taking a bus in the area. I’ve heard a lot about them.

This bus is supposed to be a pretty decent one. When the hotel booked it for me they offered me the choice between the normal bus and some upgraded bus meant for important people. They strongly recommended the better bus because it had more conveniences.

The bus ride kind of goes as you would expect it to go. It’s raining out. The trip is across mountainous areas. The roads are small. It’s dark out and I wonder if they run a lot of busses late at night so you can’t see just how close to the edge of a cliff you are getting. The drivers around here drive. They pass other vehicles aggressively. They barrel into blind turns. Some of them beep a lot. But they get you were you have to go.

I spend the trip between some combination of sleeping and typing up part of this write-up. There’s a half hour break stop for food, at which I get some weird version of a Red Bull. There seem to be other breaks on the trip but I am not sure what they are for. The supposed five and a half hour drive extends long into the night.

It’s about three in the morning by the time we finally get to our destination. We arrive in Nyaung U and so I need to take a taxi to my hotel in New Bagan. The taxi ride ends up going well. It’s a lot faster than the slow pace of the bus. The taxi driver drops me off. I ask him if this is the right place because it doesn’t look like it. He assures me it is.

I go to check in and they can’t find my booking. I’m not at the right hotel. They are able to point me in the right direction and my gps should take me the rest of the way. I walk about 8 minutes in the darkness to my hotel. When I get to the location there is a different hotel in its place. I talk to security and eventually he walks me about a block and points out into the darkness as to where my destination will be.

Finally I get there. It’s 4:30 in the morning. The hotel is pretty lame in comparison to my last one. It’s not as nice. There’s even a couple mosquitos in the room that I have to kill before I am able to slide off to bed. It’s about 6 before I head off to sleep.

Aug 09, 2016

Morning comes quickly. I wake up after about two hours of sleep. I have to plan my tour of Bagan for the day and I also have to plan where I’ll be for the next day. Neither really gets done in time and checkout time comes before I can book either. The long bus ride, the short sleep, the constant being on the move, the lame hotel, and the difficulty in booking some of this trip kind of gets to me. I’m a bit bummed and starting to reconsider my trip and how I am going about it.

I go to check out and ask the hotel if there is a tour of Bagan that I can take. The manager guy suggests an electric scooter bike. I don’t know the area at all and I was kind of hoping for a bus tour or something but I decide to go for it. These two German guys hear my hesitation and tell me to do it. They’ve been here riding these things for four days and have said it’s a really great time. Seems like I can’t go wrong for 5,000 kyat.

I also ask about a bus ride to Mandalay for later in the night. The original plan was to spend the following day in Chiang Mai. The options for swinging into Chiang Mai are pretty bad. It’s looking like I’ll need a bus to Mandalay airport and a flight out to Bangkok and then start doing a large loop of my itinerary in reverse. We’ll see how it all goes. The hotel manager books me a bus for 8 PM at night, so I have eight hours to explore around on this scooter. I’m pretty excited. The hotel just answered two big questions that I had. Going forward I’ll be using the hotels to book things and listening to the advice of the hotel staff and locals.

The scooter ride is amazing. It has to be the best way to explore Bagan. I doubted the manager’s choice to use a scooter initially, but of course his recommendation is going to be better than anything I can think of. This is what he does for a living. This is where he lives. He knows what to do and where to do it in this area a lot better than I ever will.

The freedom and access that the bike gives you is great. You can drive along from place to place. You can move from temple to temple with ease. I was able to get it up to 67 kph at one point so the thing really moves. My progression from bicycle to scooter has been rapid. I wonder if I’ll ride anything more serious on this trip.

Zipping around on this thing is such a joyful experience. You have to be careful of the other people on the road and stick to the strict policy of stay to the right unless you are passing (something only Americans can’t do), but the drive is generally just awesome. You pass temple after temple for miles and miles and miles. Eventually you stop in to a couple. They are all so different.

Temples everywhere
Temples everywhere

A lot of the times you have these temples completely to yourself. There are thousands of them. At one point there were as many as 10,000 temples built in this area. It’s the craziest thing. The temples rise like anthills out of the ground. I took this picture by entering into one of the temples and climbing up these small stairs on the second level. There is a third level to this temple that you could access if you are really feeling adventurous. But there is a no sock and no shoe policy here as well, and the view gained didn’t seem to be worth the risk of tumbling to the ground.

Temples rise like anthills
Temples rise like anthills

It’s weird that even though the earth is reclaiming this structure that you have to remove your socks and shoes to view them. The process of always removing your socks and shoes in the area has made me want to start wearing shoes less in general. And while I don’t think that will actually happen when I get back home, there is definitely a freedom and connection to the world gained that is not there by the sensory depriving layers of socks and shoes.

Thought this was alright
Thought this was alright

And here’s a selfie because I need a pic of myself in here.

Travel beard starting out strong
Travel beard starting out strong

I drove further and further. Into shady sections of town. Making wrong turns and driving far into the countryside. Every temple you go into offers a new surprise.

Feeling like a video game
Feeling like a video game

Eventually I swung back into town to grab some food. As I’m pulling into the restaurant I tragically forget to turn the bike off and it jerks forward and falls down. Luckily I avoid any serious injury. But yea I was that guy. At a restaurant that faces the entire town. I knocked over a candle in the process leaving my shorts, shirt and arms covered in flammable liquid. Seems like a bad play. Some guy picks my bike up. The restaurant worker brings me to a sink to wash up. I’m sure they see worse stuff all the time from tourists, but it’s still a bit embarrassing to have it happen to you.

No worries though. I’m starving and need food and drink. I order a soda called a Code Zero and an iced coffee. I figure it will be nice to try some local soda I’ve never heard of. It ends up being just a Coke Zero and the menu had a spelling mistake. Oh well. Food is pretty delicious. Shrimp tempura, spring rolls, and a chicken and rice dish. I end up hopping on a wifi network to book my flight and hotel for Bangkok for the following day. I sit and watch the town pass by. It’s a busy area. It’s also the same area that I first got to the night before. It was almost completely dead at 4 in the morning, but it is alive and well at dinner time.

I swing out to a store to grab another of those Red Bulls and a large water before heading back to the hotel. I repack my bags and need to grab a change of clothes to get out of this dirty gear I currently have on. I use a body bath wipe to freshen up and throw on all new clothes. It’s the first time since I’ve started traveling that I have on all new clothes. I’ve been testing how long I can get away with wearing the same clothes and surprisingly I think I can manage for a decent time.

The bus for Mandalay eventually arrives. The shuttle picks me up at 8:30 PM and takes me to Nyaung U where the bus is scheduled to leave at 9:30. This bus ride is also supposed to arrive after five hours. It ends up only taking about four. It’s a smaller bus but I have two seats to myself and can manage to be reasonably comfortable. The plan on this bus ride is to sleep. I end up getting a couple hours.

I could have spent a day in Mandalay and took a flight the following day but decided I’d rather just move on to another location. This meant that I wasn’t going to use a hotel for this night and was instead going to try to get enough hours of sleep on the bus and at the airport. This ends up working out well. There is no one at the airport but it is open. I get here around 2:15 AM after a taxi from the bus station. I sleep for a while and spend some time charging up my gear and working on this write-up.

I am going to be taking a flight in a bit to Bangkok. I will be leaving Myanmar behind. Myanmar was a tremendous introduction to Southeast Asia. It definitely provided many challenges, but also offered much to see and experience. I had a great time visiting the country. There are great people here and great times to be had. I guess its legacy with me will always be that it was my first in Southeast Asia. I am not sure I will ever make it back to Myanmar, but if I did I would be happy to explore some more.

Next up is Bangkok. But with these busses and flights and everything else I will have to see where the road will take me. For certain I am having a blast, but also I think I will be happy to return home when I have seen and experienced what I came for.

Backpacking: Southeast Asia Itinerary

The time has come to travel again. I was aiming for a trip towards the end of the summer but for some reason wasn’t feeling motivated to figure out where to head to or to make travel plans. Thankfully that has changed. Travel is and has been one of the best things in my life for a few years now. It’s opened up my view of the world. It’s allowed me to connect to and understand different people from both my country and from the world. It’s allowed me to see some of the most amazing things that both nature and humanity have been able to create. I need travel. I need to see the world. It’s something that I have to have in my life. So if there’s ever a time I don’t want to be making travel plans, it is worrisome for me. It’s an indication that some part of me is broken. I’m glad that the desire is back, and I can’t wait to get back on the road.

I have a somewhat rare chance to be able to do whatever I want to do with my life. For months now there have been no restrictions on what I’ve been able to do. I haven’t enforced any rules for myself and I’ve stepped into areas that I was not able to explore previously. I’ve been able to live exactly as I have wanted and have been able to openly feel and explore the world. It’s been great. Time like this is somewhat rare, but an effort should be made to obtain it if you can find a way to do so. With having so much time to myself I knew that I wanted to go through with some big travel plans.

My top five lists of travel destinations in no particular order are:

  • Southeast Asia
  • Eastern Europe
  • Hawaii, Australia, New Zealand
  • India
  • Southern Africa

When I travel I like to visit a lot of places in a short period of time. I like to road trip around and bounce from place to place. There are few better places in the world for me than being on the road, or the water, or in the air traveling to some new destination that I have always wanted to go to but have never been to before. These five destinations provide plenty of earth, water, and sky for me to explore. They are all places I have never been to but want to go to at some point in my life. I’m not really sure where the desires come to for some of them. I definitely want to see the entire world, but these five are preferences that I want to see first.

Initially when looking at this list, there was no place where I wanted to go to more than any other. So I needed to work through some sort of process to figure out where my adventure would be. One thing that I usually do when I travel is check up on current events. The first place I usually start is the U.S. Department of State’s International Travel’s list of alerts and warnings. The U.S. will “issue a Travel Alert for short-term events they think you should know about when planning travel to a country… and a Travel Warning when they want you to consider very carefully whether you should go to a country at all.” I wouldn’t use this list exclusively to determine if a location is safe or not safe to travel to, but it’s a pretty good start.

There are currently some interesting alerts and warnings on this list. For example there is a Travel Alert for the entire continent of Europe. That’s something that to me seems insane. Specifically France is listed for the European Soccer Championship and the Tour de France cycling race. Poland is listed for the Catholic Church’s World Youth Day event, which is expected to draw up to 2.5 million visitors to Krakow. There’s no other specific countries European countries listed under this travel alert but the U.S. had decided to group the rest of Europe in as a general alert.

The Philippines Travel Warning was another thing that I was not familiar with. It applies mostly to the Sulu Sea area and is there due to the high threat of attacks and kidnapping of international travelers.

The list of alerts and warnings and the state of the world is constantly changing, so this information will be out of date within a few days, but the point is that it would be somewhat irresponsible to head out to a location without knowing a bit of the risks associated with the journey. I wouldn’t let most of these alerts or warnings keep you from traveling but you should be smart about the environment to limit your risks.

I laid down the 42 alerts and warnings listed at this time on to a map. I used the online tool from Maploco if you have an interest in generating a similar map. It’s pretty remarkable what is listed here as either an alert or a warning. Again this map is not definitive. It includes areas that I don’t feel should be on here and it does not include other areas that it probably should. For example you are probably fine touring around the vineyards of Bordeaux or the Alps of Switzerland although there technically is an alert for these areas. You also might want to consider Rio if you will be in the area during the Olympics. Research the area you are going to for current events and be smart and keep an eye out when you head to new locations. Don’t be paranoid, but be safe.

Travel alerts and warnings
Travel alerts and warnings

Most of my top 5 came up as places that were safe to travel to. Eastern Europe I guess is technically under alert. Sure the eastern areas of Ukraine around Donetsk and Luhansk are certainly pretty dangerous. Violent clashes there have led to over 9,000 deaths. A portion of the Philippines is under warning. While eastern Ukraine and the southern part of the Philippines are likely to be off limits for me personally, most of my top 5 is still feasible.

Now that safety is confirmed, I need to look at some other aspect to cut down my list to an individual destination. One place I can remove from that list is Eastern Europe. I recently saw a large portion of Western Europe two years ago. Eastern Europe, while extremely different, is too similar of a destination for me. It’s not challenging enough to me at this point in my life. I want something more difficult. I want something that will change my worldview and push me as a person.

For the same reason I can get rid of the Hawaii, Australia, and New Zealand trip. That also would be a tremendous trip. But the difficulty level associated with this trip is not much. It seems too easy and not rewarding enough. How challenging can it be for me to be relaxing on the beaches of Waikiki, spending time in Sydney, or bouncing about the Milford Sound? That’s all stuff I’d love to do someday, but it won’t be my first choice for this trip.

That leaves me three locations that I might want to travel to at this time. Southeast Asia, India, and Southern Africa. All three of these locations are going to shatter my worldview. They are going to challenge me. I am going to grow from the experience of traveling around these places.

At this point I’m going to read about other people’s trips to these areas. I’m going to try to assemble a list of things I want to see or do in each location. If this sounds like a lot of work to you, it’s probably because it is. It’s just the way I like to travel. I don’t mind the work and research because in doing so I am learning about the world and learning about myself. Any time spent on travel in any way, even these planning stages, has always paid dividends in my life.

The plan is to spend about a month and a half or two months traveling. I’m not sure why that number but it just feels right based on past travel, the time I have available, and the things that I want to see on this trip. Anything less probably wouldn’t gain me the experience I am looking for and anything more would probably conflict with things that I want to do after this travel is over.

After some time looking into my remaining locations I decide on Southeast Asia. I chose it mostly because it’s a popular traveler location. The path is fairly worn. The areas have been tested and tried. I’m not pioneering anything by going on this trip, but it allows me the right mix of seeing a totally new part of the world while still doing it in a safe and comfortable way. Sure every travel blogger and instagrammer has been here and taken all of the cliche shots way before me. But for me this trip is pretty much exactly what I want. It seems like a natural progression from my Western Europe trip.

I also really really want to eat the food that I’ve seen so much of on television from this area. Soups and noodles and mystery meat street food. And the sights. Epic historic buildings and locations that I haven’t even heard about yet. Cultures that I have no experience in. Beautiful beaches. Nature that I can’t find anywhere else. I suppose this would have been the same for the Southern African region or the entire country of India, but I just am a bit more interested in Southeast Asia at the moment. It’s been a thought on the backdrop of my subconscious for a long time.

So where am I even going? How do I get around from place to place? How long am I going for? Do I have time to squeeze in a bit of Hawaii, New Zealand, and Australia since it’s on the way? Will I be able to swing further up the coast into China, South Korea, and Japan? Time to plan out this itinerary.

The way I went about building an itinerary is to start with googling “best places to visit in Southeast Asia”. From there I took the first two pages and parsed through the results, assigning a ranking to each location and country based on how many times it showed up on a list and how high it scored on the list. This is a process I think I want to automate when I get back as it is very valuable. I basically have no clue about where to go in Southeast Asia outside of some general ideas. But by parsing through Google results I am able to assemble the knowledge of many professionals which gives me a good idea to start with. By using the average knowledge of various experts you quickly have access to very useful information even though you are clueless on a topic.

For example the countries that showed up the most are shown below. Note that results like China and Japan and India show up. Sure they are not part of Southeast Asia, but within the first two pages of Google results there were articles for “Best Destinations in Asia” and “10 Best Places to Visit in Asia” etc. Personally I don’t mind these results showing up. The ranking algorithm I used keeps them towards the bottom of the list. I think there is an advantage to keeping these false positives in the list of results. It gives me ideas for where the trip can extend to. The 11th and 12th results for best places to visit in Southeast Asia return China and Japan. Even without knowing the geographical location of these two countries, this list suggests I may want to look into them to see if they fit into my trip itinerary. These false positives provide suggestions to better my trip in ways I may not have initially considered. I am pretty happy with this list. It is hard to argue against Thailand, Vietnam, and Indonesia as three of the best countries to visit in Southeast Asia.

Southeast Asia country rankings
Southeast Asia country rankings

Likewise I went through and parsed out and ranked the specific locations. In order to do this I had to make some decisions as to how to cluster the data. I mostly tried to keep these location results at a city level although sometime it dips down into the individual attraction level. I am kind of more interested in the general city or province level of granularity because from there another Google search can easily return the top things to do in that location. I am pretty happy with these results using rough algorithms and clustering. But eventually I would want to improve on them if I do ever automate this process. Again these results are just ideas and suggestions for someone who is clueless on the area. I think they ended up being rather useful. It’s hard to argue against the beaches of Bali, the ruins of Angkor, and the city of Singapore as being some of the best things to see in Southeast Asia.

Southeast Asia location rankings
Southeast Asia location rankings

I previously used a similar process to this to come up with a list of books to read, without having any knowledge of these books. Obviously the power of being able to assemble such information automatically without having to have any knowledge of the subject is extremely powerful. It certainly is the way that search results are heading. Eventually you will be able to tell Google “give me an itinerary for a month and a half to Southeast Asia” and it will give it to you. Until then we have to struggle through with a lot of manual data collection, parsing, and interpreting.

After laying out these Southeast Asian locations on a map, I made an initial route and timeline. From there I saw that I might have some more time available in my travel. I decided to look into Australia, New Zealand, and Hawaii. I ended up googling “best places to visit in Australia” and parsed through results and made a potential route for this area. Same with New Zealand and Hawaii. At the moment I am leaving these destinations as audibles for the trip. The ease of these locations may provide a nice contrast to some of the more difficult travel that I will be on.

This entire itinerary is open to how I am feeling at that time. I booked a one-way ticket to Myanmar. I have nothing else booked. I looked into travel and it look like I’ll be taking a lot of flights. I hear the flights are the best option but there are overnight buses and buses that you can sleep on that I may try out as they provide a great look at the country scenery. My trip is definitely extremely aggressive, so I may remove some of these destinations. I may spend more or less time in certain areas. I will book flights, buses, hotels, and attractions as I go. And I will take a one-way flight back home when I am ready.

SOUTHEAST ASIA:
4-Aug NYC
5-Aug Flying
6-Aug Yangon, Myanmar
7-Aug Inle Lake, Myanmar
8-Aug Bagan, Myanmar
9-Aug Mandalay, Myanmar
10-Aug Chiang Mai, Thailand
11-Aug Chiang Rai, Thailand
12-Aug Luang Prabang, Laos
13-Aug Luang Prabang, Laos
14-Aug Hanoi, Vietnam
15-Aug Ha Long Bay, Vietnam
16-Aug Hoi An, Vietnam
17-Aug Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
18-Aug Phnom Penh, Cambodia
19-Aug Angkor, Cambodia
20-Aug Bangkok, Thailand
21-Aug Ko Pha Ngan, Thailand
22-Aug Ko Phi Phi, Thailand
23-Aug Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
24-Aug Singapore, Singapore
25-Aug Bromo Tengger Semeru National Park, Java, Indonesia
26-Aug Bali, Indonesia
27-Aug Komodo National Park, Indonesia

AUSTRALIA:
28-Aug Sydney, Australia
29-Aug Sydney, Australia
30-Aug Melbourne, Australia
31-Aug Great Ocean Road, Australia
1-Sep Adelaide, Australia
2-Sep Uluru, Australia
3-Sep Uluru, Australia
4-Sep Uluru, Australia
5-Sep Cairns, Australia
6-Sep Cairns, Australia
7-Sep Great Barrier Reef, Australia
8-Sep Gold Coast, Australia
9-Sep Gold Coast, Australia

NEW ZEALAND:
10-Sep Christchurch, New Zealand
11-Sep Aoraki/Mount Cook, New Zealand
12-Sep Milford Sound, New Zealand
13-Sep Queenstown, New Zealand
14-Sep Punakaiki Coast, New Zealand
15-Sep Lake Taupo, New Zealand
16-Sep Lake Taupo, New Zealand
17-Sep Rotorua, New Zealand
18-Sep Waitomo, New Zealand
19-Sep Bay of Islands, New Zealand
20-Sep Auckland, New Zealand

HAWAII:
21-Sep Hawaii, Hawaii
22-Sep Hawaii, Hawaii
23-Sep Maui, Hawaii
24-Sep Oahu, Hawaii
25-Sep Kauai, Hawaii
26-Sep NYC

Where I might be
Where I might be

Once the itinerary was planned it was time to get vaccinations and visas. I would recommend getting these done as early as is possible. If you definitely know the countries and style of traveling you are doing then definitely get these vaccinations done first. Vaccinations can take months to get done. Visas may take weeks. Obviously these things are critically important. I would recommend the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for vaccinations needed for each country. Is Zika prevalent? Do I need the typhoid vaccination? Is the yellow fever vaccination required to enter the country? Etc. You’ll find the answers at that site.

Same with the visas. If you don’t take care of this stuff you may not be able to visit a country. Or worse, you may be arrested, deported, etc. during your travels. Make sure you research this from an official source as these requirements change. I would recommend the Department of State’s travel page. How many passport pages so I need? Is a visa a required? Can I get the visa in person in the country or do I have to get it before I leave the US? Are there any entry/exit requirements I should be aware or? Any events that I should be aware of when traveling there? You’ll find it all there.

As far as packing I’m going to be backpacking. I’m pretty excited about this. I’ll be using some of the gear that I picked up for hiking but also a lot of other stuff I have lying around the house. I wasn’t sure that I would be able to fit everything inside of my pack, but after watching some YouTube videos I became pretty confident that I would be able to. Some people travel for a really long amount of time with a really small pack (18L!) and only like two quick drying shirts, two underwear, and two socks and just wash them every day in a sink. I kind of want a bit more comfort than that so I’ll be going with about a dozen of each. The environment is pretty hot and casual and a complete downpour depending on the country so it shouldn’t be too difficult to keep the clothes light and compact. It’s also nice that I don’t have to pack my tent, sleeping bag, food, etc. like I would if I was hiking. There should be plenty of room in the pack for everything I need, and it should all fit as a carry-on.

So that’s about it. Can’t wait to get out there. If anyone is interested in joining up for any part of this trip feel free to reach out. I won’t be available on text or phone for the next two months but will have WhatsApp, Facebook and Messenger, Google Hangouts, email, Snapchat, Twitter, and this site during times when I grab Wi-Fi. I don’t believe I’ll be rocking a phone plan because Verizon doesn’t offer service in some of those countries and I don’t feel like grabbing a new SIM card every time I cross borders. It will be nice to unplug and go see the world.

Portal

Hiking the Columbia Trail

My buddies told me they wanted to get some more hiking in to get ready for the Appalachian Trail. They wanted to do a 15-mile trail with packs on to see how the body would respond. I told them I was in. I later found out the trail was the Columbia Trail, which runs through a portion of New Jersey I never really imagined I would ever be back in. Oh what a stroll down memory lane this would be.

The Columbia Trail is a trail that runs through Northwest New Jersey from Chester to High Bridge. It’s an old rail trail that has been converted to a trail for the public to use for biking, running, walking. It’s well paved and since it’s on an old rail line is extremely flat and straight. The difficulty of the trail is very easy. We wanted to walk the whole thing so we dropped a car off at our destination of High Bridge and then drove out to Chester to get the hike started.

Back at it again
Back at it again

The trail offers some of the standard New Jersey forest scenery. Nothing epic, but there are some nice things to look at. The trail goes through many towns. After getting our first few miles in we stopped at the Old Stone Union Church to have a look. The church, from 1774, was the site of pastorate Henry Muhlenberg. He’s credited as being the father of Lutheranism in America, a religion that has 4,000,000 followers in the States. It’s kind of cool that you can drive past or walk past areas of such influence and significance without really knowing it.

There are a lot of gravestones at this location. I love old cemeteries. There’s something beautiful about them. Maybe it’s the closeness to death. The peaceful time that you have there to contemplate what it’s all about. The immediate reminder of where you are headed usually puts me in a good perspective to go forward from there and do great things. We all are headed there someday soon. We may as well be great and have fun with it until then.

I love cemeteries
I love cemeteries

Soon after we grabbed a bench and took a break. We were five miles in. It was time for beef jerky and trail mix and some water. My body was holding up fine. A little shoulder tightening but nothing major. I should probably throw some yoga back into the rotation. The first five miles brought a lot of cheerful people. People out on the trails seem to be some of the nicest people. They’re usually in good spirits and very friendly. I’m not sure what it is, but they seem to see the world in a different way than the general population.

Continuing on in the hike we saw another cemetery. This one of a different nature. Something about the death of an automobile is kind of beautiful. You can still make out the lines or the body. You can make out the beauty. The potential. Think about what if things happened differently. But the car has been covered in rust and wear. Usually there are weeds eating at it. The earth is trying to reclaim what we took from it.

I love all of the cemeteries
I love all of the cemeteries

Heading further down the trail we stopped over a bridge to look at the sights below. It seems the bridges on the trail come every mile or two and provide a good quick moment to stretch the legs and have a closer look at the world that has slowly been moving by.

Blah blah blah
Blah blah blah

One bridge provided very clear water so we could see the fish swimming about.

Clear water
Clear water

Further and further we went. We walked through this shrub and tree farm. I loved the ways these trees, bushes, and grasses looked in real life so I was hoping the picture would come out great, but the lines aren’t as straight as I wanted them to be. The pine trees at the top also looked a lot more purple in real life, but this was probably just the result of dehydration of hiking all these miles with 40 pounds on my back in this heat.

Wish this was better
Wish this was better

The road continued onwards. There was a pretty cool old building on the trail. There was a sign that said what it was and it’s importance but I didn’t read it. I wasn’t really in the mood to read signs that day I guess. I just wanted to hike and explore a bit.

These natural tones
These natural tones

Eventually we crossed 10 miles and with it we needed another place to break. The balls of my feet were starting to hurt for some time. We eventually took a break in Califon. One of my buddies decided we should eat at this place that had wraps, sweets, salads, coffees and cold sodas called BEX. It’s a place I have been before about two years earlier. They have weird hours, usually 8-3 but it varies and they are closed on random days. I passed on the brownies and iced coffees and instead opted for a chicken wrap and a soda. It was a good spot to wash my face off with some cold water.

Not bad for a bite
Not bad for a bite

After a nice lengthy break we got back on the trail. There was a little bit of wild life on the trail.

Mr rabbit
Mr rabbit

And there was some more further down the road.

A million deer
A million deer

This stretch of the trail has a lot of cool gnome homes and weird little decorations along the trail. I enjoyed all of the little things that people built or put out on the trail. Apparently in 2014 the Hunterdon County rangers had received enough complaints about all of the magical gnomes that they went out and collected almost everything up to throw out into the garbage. I understand that some of the stuff may have been unsightly but the magical fun feeling of this part of the trail was one of my favorite parts of the trail. I guess since the 2014 event there has been some sort of understanding amongst the people and the enforcement because there were once again things on the trail and everything I saw was pretty tasteful. If you’re visiting the Columbia Trail for it’s epic nature, you’re probably doing a lot of things wrong with your life. If you have a problem with Mr. T-rex and you want to ruin the lives of little children you probably are a horrible person.

Mr. T
Mr. T

Carrying on we got to yet another bridge. It’s a bit high up, but not outrageously high. I normally would hate the fence over this bridge as it’s so absurdly overprotective. We all know if you go over the edge of a bridge you probably will be hurt. You don’t need a fence to hold you back. In this case the lighting and the fence provided a nice shot. It almost looks like you are going into some unknown dark portal of the trail.

Portal
Portal

I remember seeing some flowers earlier in the trail and I was thinking how I wanted to photograph them as they were gorgeous. I only saw about three of them before I had the chance. I didn’t see them again for about ten miles until towards the end of the trail where we ran into another patch of them. I really should have used the macro lens here to get a nice shot but I was too lazy to switch lenses and didn’t want to keep the guys waiting while I messed around with the photography. So I like this wildflower but the picture really should be a lot better.

Wild flower
Wild flower

So overall we ended up hiking 16 miles. Including the two breaks we hiked for 7 hours. That put us around 26 minutes per mile or 2.3 mph with about 40 pounds packs on our back on a very easy trail without much elevation or difficult terrain. I burned over 4,000 calories and apparently lost 7 liters of water. It was definitely a good little workout.

Endomondo stats for the win
Endomondo stats for the win

The body held up reasonably well. A bit of soreness or pain and the beginning of some blisters but overall nothing to complain about. Sixteen miles has to be the longest I have ever moved in one day on foot. I can’t recall any other day in my life in which I walked for 7 hours.

Overall I’m happy to have gotten through these sixteen miles without too much pain. It was a good hike to get the body ready for the New Jersey portion of the Appalachian Trail later on in September.

Iconic Delaware Water Gap

Backpacking at Delaware Water Gap

Since my last backpacking trip I decided to pick up some gear of my own. One reason is because a couple of the guys from my last trip want to hike the portion of the Appalachian Trail all the way across New Jersey in September over the period of about eleven days. Another reason is because backpacking opens up some options with travel. Being able to have four or five days of food, clothing and shelter in a bag that you can carry anywhere allows you to see a lot for a little. Another reason would be that hiking and backpacking allow you to get into some beautiful parts of the world that simply aren’t accessible via any other way than to physically walk to them.

In order to try to attempt this trip in September I need to put some miles on my new gear and on my body so that I’ll be ready for such an extensive trip. So when my buddy reached out to me for an overnight kayaking trip I decided I would spend the day before it by myself testing out my gear.

The location for the kayaking trip would be the Delaware Water Gap. It’s an area I’ve wanted to check out for some time as it has some of the nicest views in our area.

I was looking to get about eight miles of hiking with my pack and to find an overnight place to camp out. It was taking a little time to figure it out online so I figured I would just ask at the visitors center. My first stop was the Pennsylvania Welcome Center. I asked where I could hike eight miles and where I could stay overnight. The lady I talked to said she had no idea where I would be able to do that. She suggested I go 5 minutes to Kittatinny Point Visitor Center or 35 minutes to Dingmans Falls Visitor Center. I went over to Kittatinny.

The rangers there were much more useful. They showed me where I could hike, where I could camp, and where I could park my car for the overnight trip. The hike would be from the Kittatinny Point Visitor Center to the Red Dot (Tammany) Trail. After climbing the Red Dot I would move on to descend the Blue-blaze Trail. From there I would ascend up a leg of the Appalachian Trail up to Sunfish Pond. Finally I would set up camp about a mile back down the Appalachian Trail on the Douglas Trail at an area that is designated for overnight campers.

The Red Dot is a nice hike. It’s rated “difficult” on the park’s website, but that rating is relative. It’s 1.2 miles and the elevation rise is 1250 feet along some pretty rocky terrain. It’s a bit strenuous but plenty of different people with all sorts of different levels of experience seemed to be hiking it. The terrain can be rather rocky at times. Hiking up this with my full backpack was certainly a good workout.

Red dot gets a bit steep
Red dot gets a bit steep

The trail provides you with some iconic views of the Delaware Water Gap. I missed taking pictures of one of them because I had initially planned on descending back down the Red Dot and figured I would shoot it on my way back down. As always with pictures you should get the shot when you have a chance. The following shot is Mount Minsi of Pennsylvania along with the Delaware River as shot from the top of Mount Tammany of New Jersey. As a quick side note I never realized how big of a river this was. The 388-mile Delaware River forms borders between PA and NY, the entire border between NJ and PA, and most of the border between DE and NJ. Wilmington, Philadelphia, Camden, Trenton and Easton all touch the river at some point.

Iconic Delaware Water Gap
Iconic Delaware Water Gap

After enjoying the sights of the Red Dot Trail, it was time to descend back down the Blue-blaze Trail. The 1.7-mile descent has much more gradual than the Red Dot’s incline. The hike passed without any issues. The hike then switched onto the Appalachian Trail for another 1000 foot incline over 3.4 miles out to Sunfish Pond. The pond was alright. There is a sign out front of it declaring it as one of the seven natural wonders of New Jersey. I never knew NJ had a list of natural wonders but apparently they are the Delaware Water Gap, Great Falls of the Passaic River, High Point State Park, New Jersey Shoreline, Palisades, Pine Barrens, and Sunfish Pond. That’s not the best looking list, but certainly Sunfish Pond doesn’t belong on any top seven list. I dunno. Here’s a picture of it. It’s nice, but it’s a rather mild looking for a wonder.

Sunfish Pond
Sunfish Pond

After checking out the pond I hiked about a mile down the AT to the Douglas Trail where I would be setting up camp for the night. It was my first time setting this tent up. It setup without much of an issue. I cooked up some Thai curry vegetables and rice. It was pretty tasty for one of those dehydrated food packs. I added a couple bars, some pepperoni, and trail mix and tossed the rest of my food in a bear box that was a reasonable distance away.

My first overnight by myself
My first overnight by myself

Parking, trail access, and overnight parking is all free here. So technically I guess you can have this view for $0 per night. Especially since I have gear enough for two people and if I’m driving anyways then it would cost nothing to bring someone along. So if anyone is interested in jamming something like this, even if I don’t know you, feel free to hit me up.

Backyard for the night
Backyard for the night

A ranger came to visit me to explain where the water was and to use the bear boxes. She said there haven’t really been bears in the area much. I told her it was my first time overnighting by myself and I was a bit unsure whether I would be able to survive the night but she told me I would be fine. I ventured off to grab some water from the stream that she recommended. It was nice to crack out my water filter for the first time. The water seemed a bit sketchy but it was running and it is what she recommended so I used it. It ended up being alright but it’s a bit weird grabbing water from a stream in the middle of the woods and filtering it yourself. It’s a far cry from the luxury of the civilized world where unlimited drinkable water can be flicked on at any time or purchased at any store for a few cents.

I spent the rest of the night slowly getting ready for bed, as I was a bit tired from the long hike. The night was pretty uneventful. I woke up a couple times here or there. But for the most part the sound of crickets and nature had me in a deep sleep. I think I may have heard an animal breathing in the middle of the night but I’m not sure I did.

Eventually morning came. I woke up at 530 because I had to break everything down and then hike 3.8 miles back down to my car to meet up with the group that I would be going kayaking and canoeing with. As I was packing up another camper came over and told me that there were bears last night. He said he saw one about 20 yards from my tent. He says he thinks one followed him from the outhouse to his tent in the middle of the night. I’m not certain I believe the story but maybe there was a bear or two. He was a nice kid regardless and we had a good talk.

I hit the trail a couple minutes later than I wanted to but still early enough that I would be able to meet up on time if I hustled. The hike was downhill and the footing became easier and easier with each step. I was definitely the first person on that stretch of the AT that morning as I kept running into singular strands of spider webs that lay across the track. I got about halfway through the hike and the spider silk was becoming a bit annoying. I finally saw a girl walking up the trail. We said good morning. I added “I knocked down all of the spider webs for you.” She seemed a bit puzzled at what I had said until she realized what I meant. She thanked me and then said “oh, and I knocked down all of the spider webs for you too.” I thought that was a cute moment. People who are into all this nature stuff generally have seemed to be ultra chill so far.

Soon after I saw a deer poke its head out of the brush and onto the trail. It was maybe a hundred yards down. It paused. I paused as well. The way the lighting was and the serenity of that deer poking its head out onto the trail was for some reason a beautiful moment. I went to open my camera bag to grab my zoom lens but as soon as the velcro peeled the deer hopped back in the direction that it came from. I guess deer out here have very sensitive hearing.

The trail continued with a few more people here and there as the day grew older and the trail got closer to the parking lot. Eventually I made it to my car. I swung out to meet up with the group I’d be hanging with. There was one kid I used to work with and five other characters who all seemed like a fun time. I could not believe the amount of gear these guys had for a single overnight trip. Several coolers with all sorts of cold drinks and food that needed refrigeration, several ways to cook food including a spare grills, I think three six-man tents, luxury foldable lawn chairs. Basically everything that goes against keeping weight and space to a minimum ha. Eventually we got all of the gear on the shuttle. The shuttle ride over to the launch ramp was full of nonsense as I got to know the guys.

Eventually we loaded the canoes and kayaks with our gear and hopped in to get the trip started. Here’s a cliche kayak shot going down some body of water. I hate kayak shots like this. You see them on people’s instagrams and whatnot all the time. I also kind of hate how most people shoot and display a lot of travel/backpacking stuff in general. It just always seems so cliche and braggy and overly happy and shallow and simplistic. It often has some stupid quote from some famous traveler, author, or anonymous in some disgusting font. And the pictures are always overcontrasted and oversaturated. I dunno. Here’s an example of what I’m talking about.

Gross
Gross

Travel/backpacking/life is never like this. It’s full of a lot of challenging moments. It’s full of a lot of difficulties and annoyances. It’s a lot of work and there are a lot of trials. Sometimes you wonder why you’re doing it or wondering whether you’ll be able to get through it. I think a lot of the times you will end up alright. But pictures likes this are infuriating. Don’t make stuff like this. Don’t double tap stuff this. I mean you’re not a bad person if you like this picture. Actually you are. You are a terrible person. There’s no need to involve Krakauer, Thoreau (or Theroux), or Muir in this. I’d much rather prefer reading a paragraph you wrote or talking about your trip over a beer. The following is the same picture done much more in a style I agree with that I think most people will tragically like a lot less. It’s still photoshopped. It’s still a lie. It’s still just another cheesy kayak picture.

Do it for the gram
Do it for the gram

Remember that Emerson quote I posted before? It was just a cheesy adventure quote I grabbed from online, and wasn’t supposed to have a meaning to this write-up. But I have to go back to it for just a quick moment. “Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.” My hatred of quotes like this is the lack of context, the overall worthlessness of practical application, and the immediate head nodding that happens when people hear it. Would you agree or disagree with this quote? I suppose I could divert into a long rambling here but I’ll leave this to only a couple pros and cons and a reference to the trip. I like that the quote says to be innovative. Try things that haven’t been done before. But I also hate that the quote says to not follow any roads or paths. Many of the great treasures of the world are accessible via large roads because they’re amazing. A lot of the world that doesn’t have paths is because it’s just not that spectacular or interesting.

I had two campsites on this trip. One was along the Appalachian Trail, pretty much one of the most famous hiking trails in the world. The other was our kayaking campsite that we had to row to because it had no path. It was on a tiny island that had no areas to explore. We literally had to use machetes to cut our own path and leave our own trail. The camping site on the Appalachian Trail was clearly a lot nicer. Gorgeous views, trails to explore, there was even running water and a primitive bathroom. The camping site along the Delaware River had only a small view of the river, no trails to explore, no water to drink or place to shit. I’m not saying either one was better or worse than the other. They were both great and the contrast was appreciated. But following Emerson’s quote too rigorously would lead you to missing out on many beautiful things that life has to offer. It’s ok to follow paths and it’s also ok to leave your own trail. Do both. But as always with this stuff there’s no proof Emerson ever said the quote in the first place. So good luck even trying to identify things like context, etc. that are critical to try to get anything useful out of it. Sigh.

Kayaking a little over eleven miles was great. We ran into a couple raindrops but ultimately avoided too many mishaps. None of the kayaks or canoes tipped over although we did have one man go overboard at one point. We tried to get this one campsite on the Pennsylvania side that the group had got the first year but it was occupied this year. So we drifted along to a nearby island to setup shop. Setting up camp went without much difficulty.

I guess I needed some filler in this story, and that was the purpose of that rambling, as I have no pictures from kayaking to breakfast the next morning. There was a lack of things to do on the secluded island. There was a lot of drug use and people got pretty chill. It’s not exactly my style but I’m not trying to fuck up rotation either. I at first didn’t mind sitting glued to my seat for several hours as I was a bit beat from the eight miles of hiking the day before, the four miles of hiking earlier this morning, and the eleven miles of kayaking in the day. But eventually it got a bit tiresome being a prisoner on an island and being incapable of moving on to something more exciting.

Eventually morning came, and with it some more delicious food. The day before brought chicken tacos and steaks. This morning it was time for pork roll, egg, and cheeses. Well we forgot the cheese, but the rest of it was there. It kind of blows my mind that these guys are eating this good on this trip. It makes sense with all the gear that they brought but I’m more used to a world of dehydrated eggs or just having some beef jerky and trail mix to start the day off. One luxury I do bring backpacking is coffee. It’s nice to have a cup and provides something to do when you’re done setting up camping or relaxing in the morning before you head out for a long day of hiking. Also I can’t believe this is such a bad picture of pork roll but so it goes sometimes when you’re sloppy behind the lens.

Different kind of camping
Different kind of camping

After we fueled up and broke down camp and loaded up the kayaks and canoes we hopped back in for another five-mile paddle back to the parking lot. The weather today was nicer. The clouds, which provided sun protection the day before, yielded to provide some gorgeous views. Here’s another shot with a kayak in it, since you know I am so fond of them. I really like how clear the water is at some points. Being able to look down at fish, grasses, and textures of the river floor is rather beautiful. We kept an eye to sky to try to see some bald eagles like we did the day before but we had to settle for watching some hawks hunt.

I hate shots like this
I hate shots like this

Kayaks and canoes are pretty cool because you can just paddle here or there and tie off and go exploring. It’s neat being on the Delaware River as you can bounce back and forth from NJ to PA quicker than a car would even be able to.

Getting around
Getting around

The guys wanted to do a jump off of a cliff that they have done in previous years. Apparently the first time they attempted the 35ish-foot jump they kind of looked down at the water and guessed it was deep enough. The casualty of risking serious injury is impressive. Depths in this area seem to vary between deep and shallow significantly and to dive without verifying the depth seems insane. You also need a good clean jump to be able to clear the base of the cliff here. We had three of the seven successfully complete the jump. Props to those guys for getting it done. I was happy to use the excuse that I was better suited to try to take some awesome pictures than performing the jump myself.

These boys are crazy
These boys are crazy

After the jump we hopped back in the canoes and caught a nice drift that swung us underneath the Delaware Water Gap Toll Bridge and back to the Kittatinny Visitor Center where our adventure would end. We unpacked our gear, said our goodbyes, and went our separate ways.

Here are the endomondo stats from the two days of kayaking. For whatever reason my phone wasn’t cooperating on all of the hikes so I won’t be posting the partial data from that. Unfortunately that’s the data I’m more interested in as I’d like to know how I’m doing so that I can get ready for this longer trip in September.

Kayaking 16 miles
Kayaking 16 miles

I don’t really know if there are many takeaways from this trip. I was happy with how carrying, setting up, and breaking down my gear went as it was my first time with a lot of that equipment. I used a lot of what I learned when I was out at Round Valley and everything went smoothly. I removed a couple pieces from my pack when I got back that I don’t think I’ll use in the future to save a little space and weight, but overall I was pretty happy with all of my gear and how everything worked out. You don’t really need all that much to survive and there are plenty of luxury items that I’m happy carrying in my pack to make life on the trail a bit more enjoyable.

I was a bit surprised by how chill I was with hiking and setting up camp and sleeping by myself. Pretty much at no point was I physically or mentally uncomfortable with the overnight backpacking trip by myself. It kind of just felt like life as usual.

I liked the group I hung with on the second day. It’s not a group I would seek out to hang out with but they taught me some important things. They’re all doing the best that they can and to hear some of their stories or to see some of their hidden skills was cool. Some of them definitely are living a great life compared to where they came from. You could see there are layers and layers of complexity in these people that just are completely invisible upon first glance. In many ways their progress as an individual has exceeded mine. I had a great time with you guys.

I guess finally coming home to my little place on the border of Asbury Park and Ocean Grove felt like home more than it ever has. I’m not sure why as I was really comfortable sleeping in the woods. But for some reason driving home and slowly being caressed by that ocean breeze and getting back into the beautiful mess that is summer at the shore were comforting.

Moon

Backpacking at Round Valley

Went on my first backpacking trip from Thursday to Friday at Round Valley Recreation Area in Lebanon, NJ. I didn’t have the gear that I needed so I borrowed enough from my buddy Dave to make it through the trip. We went with two of his buddies from his work.

I initially didn’t plan to cook, only having dry food on me. This included such delicacies as prosciutto, Genoa salami, and Parmigiano Reggiano cubes because they seemed to make sense when I was shopping at Wegmans the night before. But on the way up we stopped at a Walmart and I picked up a 24-oz Stainless steel cooking pot, which can be used to boil water in combination with a lightweight alcohol stove. The pot included two 10-oz plastic cups which were great for cups of coffee. I also picked up my first freeze-dried meal of sweet and sour pork and rice. I added a LED headlamp flashlight that allowed provided hands free light for the nighttime.

The rendezvous point was the Spinning Wheel Diner which is a few miles away from Round Valley. It’s a classic New Jersey diner that allowed for a final meal of eggs, bacon, hash browns, toast, orange juice, and coffee before leaving the luxuries of the civilized world behind.

Here’s a shot of us at the start of the Cushetunk Trail, which is the red trail at Round Valley.

Backpacking squad
Backpacking squad

The hike was about 7.5 miles to get to the campground. It has a decent amount of up and down and comfortable terrain. On the hike in I spent a lot of time looking around and soaking up the view.

Hike had some nice scenery
Hike had some nice scenery

Don’t forget to look in every direction.

Views from the bottom
Views from the bottom

And don’t forget to take a couple selfies on the trail.

Trail selfie
Trail selfie

Here are the Endomondo stats of the trek. I started it a couple minutes late. The return trip was almost the same except a slight bit longer.

Endomondo stats
Endomondo stats

The campsite looked like it hadn’t been used in some time. We swept the leaves away from the campsite with homemade brooms. We build seats and benches as needed to provide for seating. At least us guys that didn’t have the fancy lightweight chairs that the experts had.

After a bit of preparation of the campsite we ventured down to the lake to get some water. This was accomplished via the SweetWater Microfilter water filtration system. Basically you stick the filter in pretty much any water and pump it into your container. Then you add a couple drops of the SweetWater purifier solution, which is pretty much 3.5% sodium hypochlorite and wait about ten minutes and you have drinkable water. It’s amazing. It’s especially amazing when you are in a place with no drinkable water and you just ran out of water.

Filtering water
Filtering water

There are a lot of cool things to explore and discover down by the lake. I though these shells were pretty cool.

Little details around the lake
Little details around the lake

And here’s a picture of a piece of broken glass I thought photographed decently.

Piece of glass
Piece of glass

Here’s another shot of the lake. The water level seemed a little low but I am not too familiar with Round Valley. The last time I was here I was out on a boat with my pops fishing on the lake many years ago. While I remember those times I don’t remember what the water level was at that time.

Round Valley
Round Valley

We went back to the campsite and hung out and cooked up a meal. Surprisingly that freeze-dried stuff is pretty decent. The rice has the taste and consistency of a reasonable risotto. I’ve definitely had risotto at several places which wasn’t as good as this stuff.

After some time we strolled down to the lake to catch a pretty glorious sunset.

Caught a nice sunset
Caught a nice sunset

It definitely was a pretty nice sunset.

It was pretty lit

Day turned to night. With it came the Ghost Radar app to try to hunt down some ghosts. I think we had a bit of success.

Moon
Moon

We were all a bit tired from the hike earlier in the day so we proceeded for a somewhat early night of sleep. Some people say the two-man tents are too tight for two people, but they are acceptable. I think it’s definitely good to get a two-man tent even for yourself because a two-man tent provides allows you to keep your gear covered from the rain. It also allows a newbie like me to tag a long and doesn’t add much more weight to your pack.

The night of sleep was mostly uneventful. I woke up at one point and heard a deer. I also heard something else that I am not sure what animal it was. There was a point in the night when I kind of realized I love the conveniences and modern luxuries that we have back home, but by the end of the trip I would be grateful for the challenge and the simplicity of the trip.

In the morning we woke up and brewed up some coffee and had some breakfast. We packed up and made the hike back to the entrance. We said goodbye to one camper who was stayed a second night. Another 7.5 miles. There was some rain on the return leg. It wasn’t so bad though because it was sparse enough and the trees often provided a comfortable amount of cover. The walk back was certainly more of a head-down hike, just trying to push my body back to the car. But there was great scenery to be had as well.

Return hike
Return hike

Overall my first backpacking experience was great. I kind of want to get back out there again. Burning off 3600 calories just on the two hikes and working the legs and shoulders was great. When you get into some space and are hiking alone in the woods and only have the sound of the woods and your footsteps you can drift off into some deep thought. It was also a good experience to learn what you have to do to survive and to reflect on how absurdly fortunate we are to live the lives of luxury that we live.

Shout out to my backpacking buddies for showing me the ropes and keeping me alive. I learned a lot and had a great time.