Preikestolen, Bremen, Berlin, Nuremberg, Zurich, Vaduz, Lake Como

And the final stretch of the trip:

July 31 – Drive to Preikestolen, Norway
August 1 – Preikestolen, Norway
August 2 – Bremen, Germany
August 3 – Berlin, Germany
August 4 – Nuremberg, Germany
August 5 – Zurich, Switzerland and Vaduz, Liechtenstein
August 6 – Lake Como, Italy
August 7 – Home

Well, here we are. The end of my Eurotrip. 45 days later. It sure went fast.

Since the last time I have done a lot of traveling, both by driving and by taking several ferries. I wanted to see Preikestolen in Norway (Preacher’s Rock or Pulpit’s Rock as it is called in the English translation). Norway has a tremendous amount of beautiful things to see and experience and they are dispersed throughout the country. This is great because there is always something amazing within driving distance, but not that great because you can’t see it all in a few days. You have to spend a lot of time in Norway to see it all. For me, Preikestolen looked like the best place to go to in Norway. Even with the 8-hour trip from Oslo, I thought it was worth it.

So off I went, from one side of the country all the way across to the other side of the country. It was a lot of driving, but the scenery along the way was gorgeous. I couldn’t really stop to take pictures of the beautiful scenery but I did get this picture of some horses for my sis who’s been asking me the whole trip for pictures of horses.

Got some horses
Got some horses

That was the only picture I really took all day. When I finally got to the Preikestolen area, a trip that included hopping on a ferry, I drove up to the top to scope out the situation for tomorrow’s hike. Or at least as far as the road will take you. There is a parking lot at the top that is 2.4 miles away from the final destination. From this point it looked nice, and I was hoping the 1,100-foot increase in height would make for some better views. Plus it was cloudy, raining, and getting dark when I got there.

I grabbed some sleep in the car, thinking about the hike the next day.

I was slightly worried about the whole hike, but I was more than committed at this point. The round trip would be 5 miles, up and down through some steep rocky terrain, and it was still raining and cold in the morning when I woke up. I didn’t have any rain gear. My outfit consisted of pants, a t-shirt, and boat shoes (the best shoes that I had for the hike, which I thought would be dearly inadequate). I looked around at all of the other hikers who had the works; rain gear, nice boots, and proper backpacks. Oh well, this was something that I had to see, so I was off.

I took an umbrella with me as well so that I could protect my Norwegian baguette and camera if the rain became bad. As I start hiking, the weather started clearing up. By the time I had got to the first picture spot, the rain was gone and the blue sky was out. The clouds turned from grey to white. Looks like maybe I would be all right with the weather after all. The boat shoes were holding up fine.

Weather turns out to be nice
Weather turns out to be nice

Further and further I climbed. There were a decent amount of people hiking and the crowd was very diverse. People of all ages were making the trek up to Preikestolen. Apparently in Norway they start hiking with their children at a very early age. I remember a decent amount of people carrying babies and small kids, some sitting on their parent’s shoulders, up the mountain like it was no big deal. I remember seeing two girls hiking with her mom, one of whom you could tell was just finishing up learning how to walk. I was pretty impressed that a 4-5 year old was attempting this hike, but she was smiling and enjoying it.

Further and further up I climbed. The hike up is a decent hike. It’s similar to doing stairs for a long time, only the stairs are just rocks that you have to navigate across. I thought I was getting somewhere but I couldn’t see the Preacher’s Rock so I knew I had to go on further. I climbed a couple peaks that I thought surely would be it. Thinking I was further along then where I was, there was one point where I joked with myself that the place where I was standing was the halfway mark (I later found out it was). The views along the hike are great and there are plenty of places to stop for a water/food/picture break if you need to.

Hiking to Preikestolen
Hiking to Preikestolen

Some of the views that open up are tremendous. The bad weather had completely gone away and you could see for miles in the distance at some openings. These views were great, but you really have to make it to the top to fully appreciate this hike. When I saw this, I knew that I had to be close.

Norway, so gorgeous
Norway, so gorgeous

Turns out, I was pretty close. Here’s the first shot of Preikestolen. It is a very steep cliff that is 1,982 feet above the ground. If you hate heights or easily get vertigo, you might want to skip the next couple pictures. It might not look like it from this picture, but it goes straight down.

First shot of Preikestolen
First shot of Preikestolen

This picture shows how vertical the cliff is. It also shows the beautiful water that runs beneath the cliff. The views up here are astounding. You forget all about the hike when you are up here looking around. But you have to be careful. The cliff drops straight off, so if you happen to go over the cliff, there is no saving you.

It drops straight down
It drops straight down

There have not been many accidental deaths off of Preikestolen, which is surprising given that people go right up to the edge. Some people even sit with their feet dangling off. I think the first accidental death happened in October 2013 and I haven’t seen a story documenting another since then. There have been several suicides off of the cliff but that number is also low given the difficulty of reaching the top. I’m a pretty cautious fellow, so I thought for sure I would be staying far away from the edge. But I also had to make sure I got the best pictures that I could get. So here’s a picture that I took at the edge of the cliff, with Preikestolen on the right side. You can see how it just drops right down. It’s pretty wild being this close to death.

At the edge of Preikestolen
At the edge of Preikestolen

That was enough for me. Thumbs up for Preikestolen and not falling over.

Thumbs up for not going over
Thumbs up for not going over

Here’s just one more shot of the fjord. Tremendous place that I definitely recommend to anyone.

View from the top
View from the top

Preikestolen was what I thought would be that last major stop on the trip. The rest of the trip would almost be like a victory lap. Back through Denmark, Germany, Switzerland, and Italy, all places that I had already been through, only this time in different cities. I wasn’t sure where I would be spending the night. I really wanted to make it as close to Bremen, Germany as possible, but that was fourteen hours away and included two ferries. The roads in Norway were mostly 35-50 mph due to winding around all the mountains and lakes. I hopped on both ferries. I drove and drove. Eventually I got three hours outside of Bremen and decided to grab some sleep for the night.

In the morning I made the three-hour drive to Bremen. I was able to check in early at the hotel. I’ve been able to check in early at almost all of my hotels. They usually have a check in of 3 PM but I generally get to a place around 11 AM and get a room no problem. I grabbed some extra sleep at the hotel and showered up and got to checking out the town. Bremen Cathedral, or St. Peter’s Cathedral sits in the market square in the center of Bremen. Like many of the churches in Europe, its history is a long one. Parts of it collapsed. It was knocked down. It’s had bombs dropped on it and lightning strike it and every other thing possible since the first church was built there over 1,200 years ago. It’s been rebuilt, refinished, and restored a whole bunch of times.

St. Peter's Cathedral in Bremen
St. Peter’s Cathedral in Bremen

I had plans to go to a place for dinner but I saw a bunch of tents and outside seating along the water with German beer and German food. I grabbed a Franziskaner Hefe-Weisse Dunkel and bratwurst at one place, and followed that up with a Paulaner Hefe-Weissbier and some currywurst, which is a sausage, cut up and drowned in a curry ketchup.

German beer and currywurst
German beer and currywurst

Paulaner’s had a bunch of tents and tables by the water and they also had their outdoor and indoor seating at their restaurant. Sure, Bremen isn’t Munich, but Bremen still is Germany. I’d recommend this waterfront area for when it’s nice out and the tents and outside seating is setup. It’s felt like a mini-Oktoberfest.

Paulaner's in Bremen
Paulaner’s in Bremen

After dinner I strolled around to the opposite side of the river. I scored this pick of the tents and the people. That’s where I was having my dinner. Melissa told me to take some good night shots on this trip so I’ve been trying to get some good shots and I think this one is pretty good. I’ve definitely learned a ton about photography on this trip. I still have quite a bit more to learn but I’m getting some respectable shots for something I consider just a small hobby.

Bremen at night
Bremen at night

Bremen was meant to give me a break from the absurd driving that I was doing the previous days. The drive to Berlin was a short three and a half hours. Driving on the Autobahn is incredible. Every driver is very aware of the other drivers and they only use the left lane to past. I’ve been cruising on the Autobahn between 90-100 mph, not pushing my little Opel past that. Even at that speed cars are passing me. It’s a beautiful thing.

When I got to Berlin, the first stop I made was to check out the Berlin Wall. Parts of the wall have been left up but almost all of it has been knocked down. This portion is from near the Berlin Wall Memorial. This side is clean but the other side is bombed with graffiti. I like graffiti when it’s done right, but I think the plain wall looks so cold. The cloudiness and rain helped add to the effect.

Berlin Wall
Berlin Wall

A short walk took me to Mauerpark. It’s a pretty neat place that is a hipster’s dream. There’s a flea market where you can score cool stuff. There’s a grass area that is a wasteland. It seems like Berlin in general is a hipster/hippie mecca.

Flea market at Mauerpark
Flea market at Mauerpark

A short walk from the flea market leads you to outside seating where they do karaoke on Sundays. A lot of people are there to watch whoever is brave enough to get up on stage sing their song. The acts I saw might not have been the best at singing, but they made up for it with the humor.

Karaoke in Mauerpark
Karaoke in Mauerpark

I decided to head back to grab my car. On the way back I happened to get this horse and carriage riding along the Berlin Wall.

Some more horses
Some more horses

I hopped in my car and drove off to Berghain, one of the craziest clubs in the world. Yes, it was Sunday at 7 PM and I was going to a club. And no I wasn’t early. I was late. The party does not stop here. People have been partying inside here for over 24 hours straight. Sunday mornings are a very popular time to go to Berghain. The write-ups of this club make it seem like something totally out of control. No cameras or picture taking allowed. It’s extremely hard to get into and you can be kicked out of a long line if you aren’t wearing the right thing, don’t talk German, or a slew of other reasons. It’s sex, drugs, and rock and roll (although rock has been replaced with house and techno). Hence, no pictures. Anything goes. And in a world where everyone is taking pictures of everything and posting it, I thought it would be interesting for that aspect alone. I wanted to go in to experience the place. I’ve been to some of the greatest churches in the world on this trip. I’ve seen all sorts of art at different museums. I’ve seen some of the world’s greatest nature and had some of the world’s best foods. I wanted to see what one of the world’s best clubs was like.

Yea, that's Berghain
Yea, that’s Berghain

I pull up and I hear the hum of 808’s bumping techno and house. I get out of the car. I take a picture of the place. And I just can’t bring myself to go. I don’t know why, really. Maybe it was the cloudy, rainy day. Maybe I had been traveling too much. Maybe it was the realization that it’s time for me to grow up and move on. And so I hopped back in the car and had some Pringles (Paprika flavored, that’s the European way), and thought on it. The answer became more and more clear. I wasn’t going to go. I was going to take a slow, leisurely drive to Nuremberg. And so I did. As I drove out of Berlin, a rainbow appeared. It looked like the cloudy, rainy weather that had been around me for the previous bunch of days might finally give way to some sunshine.

Nuremberg is a much smaller city than Berlin. There are a dozen things I would still want to do if I went to Berlin again, but I would be happy enough with my one visit to Nuremberg. Nuremberg has its churches, this one being St. Lorenz.

St. Lorenz in Nuremberg
St. Lorenz in Nuremberg

I thought this was pretty sweet. It’s a 14th century fountain called Schoner Brunnen, which translates to Beautiful Fountain. It looks unlike most things I’ve seen on this trip, but that’s probably because of the perspective. It’s really pretty similar to any gothic spire that you would see on any of the gothic churches of Europe, but the detail and style is greater and different. The colors are eye-catching. There are two brass rings that have been seamlessly welded into the iron fence and they bring you good luck if you spin them. The Frauenkirche, or Church of Our Lady is seen in the background of this picture. It’s another amazing building.

Schoner Brunnen, Beautiful Fountain
Schoner Brunnen, Beautiful Fountain

Nuremberg isn’t exactly known for being the most beautiful place in the world, but I’m going to miss walking down cobblestone streets like this.

I'll miss you Europe
I’ll miss you Europe

For dinner I was planning on going to Albrecht Durer Stube, which is highly rated German restaurant that has the classic fare and beverage at a reasonable cost. It’s what I was in the mood for, but it was closed. I decided to head to O-Sha Thai Restaurant which had rave reviews. The tom young soup was out of control good and the crispy duck was good, but they weren’t kidding when they said spicy. Good thing I had a German beer to cool the taste buds. I’m also going to miss eating outside just about every day. I love how eating outside is such a big part of European culture.

Thai food, German beer
Thai food, German beer

Zurich, Switzerland was up for the next day. I was told Zurich was a place where you can go for fancy things so it was nice to see this building totally bombed. Everyone tags everything in Europe. There’s a lot of graffiti here, but usually not on buildings. There are at least some attempts here to move beyond tagging and into street art, but it’s most just tags.

Graffiti in Zurich
Graffiti in Zurich

I had to get some more Swiss chocolates. The chocolate out here is amazing. This is Sprungli, one of the best. This is the original gangster of Swiss chocolate that is still doing its thing. There were a couple chocolatiers that started before Sprungli, but companies like Nestle and Kraft Foods now own them.

Sprungli turns up
Sprungli turns up

Zurich is a beautiful city. The river that runs through it is great to walk along. There are plenty of the usual shops, restaurants, etc.

Walking in Zurich
Walking in Zurich

By now I have become an expert at getting into, parking in, and exploring a new city and I think I can get a feel for a place in a couple of hours. I broke down Zurich pretty quickly and wanted to get out of there. I would have had too much time if I just went to Lake Como directly, so I pulled up a map. I would not be going to Luxembourg like I thought I was, or Liechtenstein. My country count would end up being 13 and not 14 like I thought. Yes, I decided to count Vatican City as a country after all. Mainly because I needed to make up for the two countries I wouldn’t be able to see, and well, also because it is actually a country. It may be the smallest country in the world, but I’m counting it.

So I’m looking at the map and I realize Liechtenstein isn’t that far away. It’s only about an hour from Zurich to Vaduz, the capital of Liechtenstein. I decided to make the drive and get my country count back to 14 like I said I would. The drive was gorgeous. The mountains provided a stunning backdrop that had me cursing the darkness as it rolled in. Of course I had to see the Vaduz Castle, the number one tourist attraction in Liechtenstein.

Country number fourteen
Country number fourteen

And that was it. I was out of there. Liechtenstein was pretty dead. It’s a weird feeling being one of the only people out and about in the capital city of a country. Feels kind of like Will Smith’s character in I Am Legend. I made the drive to Lake Como. I really wish it wasn’t dark because I had to cross over a mountain and it looked beautiful driving to Lake Como. The area around the lake looked gorgeous too, but I couldn’t see too much because it was night out.

In the morning I was pleasantly treated to the view of the pool, with Lake Como and a neighboring city in the background.

Turned up for the final stay
Turned up for the final stay

I decided to get some relaxing in while I was staying at Lake Como. There are several different places that you can stay at when you are in Lake Como, so really I was staying in Menaggio.

Have to relax a little
Have to relax a little

Had to get a little swimming in between tanning sessions.

Just swimmin
Just swimmin

After freshening up, I grabbed a ferry over to Bellagio to spend some time hanging around. Bellagio is probably the place you think of when ever you hear about Lake Como. Here’s Menaggio from the ferry. My hotel is the yellow building on the left, right by the ferry stop.

Menaggio, Lake Como
Menaggio, Lake Como

And here is Bellagio. The towns around the lake look pretty similar. They all have similarities and differences. Bellagio was a nice place to stroll around. Although it’s the bigger, touristier town, it’s still very small. I grabbed a final dinner of spritz, caprese, pizza with prosciutto, and espresso and finished with gelato from a gelateria.

Bellagio, Lake Como
Bellagio, Lake Como

I hopped the ferry and got back to Menaggio and strolled around. Took one final picture, chucking up the deuces.

That's the end of this chapter
That’s the end of this chapter

And that pretty much wraps this all up. Have to do some packing and I have an early flight out of Milan, but I should be back home tomorrow.

This trip has been quite the experience. I’ll post a full wrap up when I have some time and when it all can sink in.

I have a ton of video footage that I’m going to break down to make an awesome video of the whole trip that I will post later.

I’m happy that I am doing exactly what I want to do with my life. I look forward to continuing that by starting up a business in the near future, of which I will also make posts here.

Hopefully I have inspired you to achieve some dreams of your own. Life is too short not to do what you really want to do. If I can help you in any way with your dreams then reach out. I’ll be happy to help.

I can’t wait to see everyone back home and get back to working on some other dreams of mine.

Thank you for taking time to read this. I don’t foresee any world travels in the near future, but if you want to go somewhere and you are looking for a travel buddy, you might be able to twist my arm.

Peace.

Love.

Joe